Questions tagged [adiectivum]

For questions about adjectives.

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6
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0answers
166 views

Etymology of “ingeniōsus” and “ingenuus”

Can someone please explain how these two words, ingenuus ingeniōsus both deriving from gignō, come to mean what they respectively do? BACKGROUND According to Wiktionary, ingenuus is made of in- +‎ ...
9
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1answer
175 views

Deriving adjectives from city names

One can often derive adjectives from city names, the most famous example probably being Romanus from Roma. Such derivatives are typically formed with -anus or -ensis. My impression is that -anus is ...
7
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1answer
81 views

Expressing a number of years with a single word

An answer to an earlier question about age of wine introduced me to adjectives for specific ages in years. Similarly, there are nouns for periods of time in years. For example: bimus & biennium ...
6
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1answer
1k views

What is the difference between niger and ater?

L&S gives descriptions of niger and ater, but the difference is is not clear to me at all. Both mean black, but there appears to be a difference in nuance — as practically always when two ...
7
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3answers
209 views

What is “old” in the age of a wine?

If I were to say "this man is 40 years old" in Latin, I would say hic vir 40 annos natus est. That is, I would use the participle natus instead of any adjective meaning "old", and it is my impression ...
5
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1answer
132 views

What is the difference between Asianus and Asiaticus?

There seem to be two Latin adjectives that mean "Asian": Asianus and Asiaticus. The dictionary entries in Lewis and Short linked above suggest that the two adjectives are different, but no comparison ...
7
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1answer
269 views

Nominalized adjective in Latin?

How to nominalize adjectives in Latin? In English, adjectives can be nominalized with a slight different in meaning: "the sick man", "the sick". In German, it's possible to nominalize the present ...
4
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1answer
85 views

Capitalization of adjectives with prefixes

When answering a recent question about the prefix per-, I gave an example of a national adjective (Finnus) with a prefix, to produce Perfinni. If I attach a prefix to an adjective that always starts ...
7
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2answers
323 views

Can “per-” be applied to any adjective?

A long while ago, I came across a few dictionary entries under per-, meaning "very." I saw peracer, perbonus, and some others. But, I'm not sure if per- can be used as a prefix for any adjective. Can ...
8
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1answer
107 views

Niveus and nivosus

I would like to compare the two adjectives niveus and nivosus derived from nix, "snow". My prior understanding of these words was that niveus is "snow-white" and nivosus is "snowy", but L&S tells ...
6
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1answer
180 views

How would you translate the exclamation, “How morbid!”

I would like to exclaim in Latin, "how morbid!" This came up because just recently I read something morbid. But how would I say this? I am guessing that this is possible: Quam morbidus! But when I ...
10
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3answers
2k views

Meaning of *iuvenis*

I seem to remember reading that iuvenis referred to someone roughly between 15 and 30. However, my Collins Latin Dictionary states it refers to someone between 30 and 45. Since a man could serve as ...
9
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3answers
1k views

How To Say “-able” in Latin

Is it possible to use something similar to the English suffix "-able" to show that the action described can be done by someone or something? If not, what phrases do you suggest to use in its place?
7
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1answer
164 views

Slippery when wet

Sometimes people are warned of slippery surfaces with signs saying "slippery when wet". I would like to know how to phrase such a sign in Latin. Translating a full sentence is easier: This road is ...
6
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1answer
121 views

How do you translate these verbal adjectives? (Greek)

I'm reading a passage from Plato's Republic which was adapted by my textbook author. I have some questions about the use of verbal adjectives in this sentence (ἀποδοτέον and χρηστέον). Καὶ ταῖς ...
9
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1answer
623 views

Are “parvus” and “magnus” the best adjectives to describe the length of a river?

In the first chapter of Lingua Latina per se Ilustrata, there are a series of sentences used to teach the usage of two adjectives, magnus and parvus. For example: Nīlus fluvius magnus est. Tiberis ...
7
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1answer
80 views

Is differens different?

I would like to understand the Latin participle differens and compare it to the English adjective "different". The verb differre means roughly "to carry apart", but Lewis Elementary also lists "to be ...
7
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2answers
125 views

How to translate “main”?

I am looking for a Latin adjective — or several adjectives if no single one is enough — meaning "main". I might want to talk about a main building or the main idea of a theory. The only ...
4
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3answers
125 views

English adjective derived from Latin for “per equal amount of datapoints”

I'm not completely sure if this is the correct place to ask this, but let's try. Many thanks in advance. I would like to invent a term for an average per equal amount of (sorted) data. With that I ...
6
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1answer
642 views

Which adjective to use for tallness of people?

If a person is tall, which adjectives can I use? Which one of them is most common in classical Latin? The most suitable-looking adjectives I know are altus, procerus and longus, but I found no clear ...
13
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1answer
144 views

Is fessus a participle?

The adjective fessus (wearied, tired, fatigued, worn out, weak, feeble, infirm) sounds and looks like it could well be a participle. If there is a verb, I would assume it to mean something in the ...
6
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2answers
257 views

Can the gerundive be used like an adjective?

Can I use a gerundive like I would use an adjective as in the following example? It sounds fine to me, but I am somewhat suspicious; my intuition has failed before. Infans lavandus clamabat. The ...
7
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1answer
561 views

How to derive nouns from adjectives?

I know several ways to derive nouns from adjectives: audax > audacia, laetus > laetitia, pius > pietas, magnus > magnitudo. Questions: Are there any rules that govern which one of -ia, -itia, -tas ...
5
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1answer
268 views

What is the Nominative of 'uniuscuiusque'?

This is taken from Spinoza's Ethics: notandum est Iƒ veram uniuscujusque rei definitionem nihil involvere neque exprimere præter rei definitæ naturam. As I can see, it is Adjective in Genitive and ...
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1answer
227 views

Latinitas for other languages

Latinitas could be described as high quality Latin. If I want to refer to the same thing for other languages, can I use nouns like Graecitas, Anglicitas or Finnicitas? (I am not sure if Anglitas and ...
9
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1answer
118 views

Aut *celer* aut *vēlōx*?

Celer and vēlōx are often treated as synonymous. I feel certain that I learned the technical distinction between them once: that celer was potential speed, while vēlōx was actual speed. So Usain Bolt ...
8
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1answer
160 views

Translating “Hic fortissimus, primus inter pares” into English

I am currently studying Latin in high school (third year), so I do have a mild understanding of how the language works. But I would like to know whether this translation is correct. For various ...
5
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3answers
298 views

Greatly fruitful in Latin?

I lack ample knowledge of Latin to piece together a proper equivalent phrase of the following: "Greatly fruitful," or "Great bounty"; in the context of referring to a food being very nutritious. Here'...
5
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2answers
130 views

Aurora Natalis or Aurora Natalicus?

I have practically no experience with Latin, but from what I understand Aurora Borealis roughly means northern dawn, and Aurora Australis roughly means southern dawn. What would be the equivalent way ...
8
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3answers
420 views

What are the normal genitive and dative singular forms of “alius”?

Some sources mention a genitive singular alius, but I've also seen aliae. And I don't recall seeing a dative singular ali, but neither do I remember alio. I think several forms exist, including even ...
13
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1answer
117 views

When did nouns and adjectives derived from pronouns appear?

Latin has some nouns and adjectives derived from pronouns: unicus, identitas, qualitas, neutralis… I have the impression that such derivations are mainly later than classical, but I do not ...
8
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1answer
190 views

Negativus and positivus

When, if ever, did the adjectives negativus and positivus evolve into an antonym pair like the English "negative" and "positive", and how did positivus get this meaning? Deriving negativus from the ...
8
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1answer
2k views

How do you convert a noun to an adjective in Latin?

I'm thinking that a houseguest who stays on your couch should be something like hospes lectuli. But that sounds more like a guest invited by your couch, which is silly. In my non-expert understanding ...
7
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1answer
207 views

Is the noun Bonum, -i simply a substantive of the adjective Bonus, -a -um?

The noun Bonum ("a good thing") seems to have taken on a life of its own as a distinct word in Latin usage. In derivation and meaning, is this simply a neuter substantive of the adjective Bonus ("...
7
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1answer
955 views

How to emphasize adjectives?

In English, and most modern European languages, we have one single word, "very," which is accepted as the regular way to make an adjective more extreme. Is there a common way to do this in Latin? Ways ...
6
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2answers
3k views

What is the difference between suus and eius?

What is the difference between the possessive adjective suus (his, hers, its, theirs) (and its declensions) and the genitive, possessive pronoun eius (of her, of him, of it)? Can these words be ...
14
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2answers
413 views

Are there many irregular adjectives for the Latin comparison?

I just learned the comparison for adjectives. Most adjectives have regular conjugations (every case/grammatical gender has its own output). But I learned a few irregular adjectives as well (all in ...
6
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1answer
146 views

Rerum to strengthen an adjective?

I read in my Latin to English and English to Latin dictionary that the genitive plural of res is used to strengthen an adjective. However, my latin teacher said that he thought that if a superlative ...
9
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1answer
203 views

Usage of adjective solus

I'm trying to translate the sentence "The whole state was thanking this man's brother alone." (that is, the brother the only one being thanked) My try is: Tota civitas fratri huius soli gratias agebat....
10
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2answers
466 views

In the title “Ars Goetia,” is “Goetia” an appositive noun?

Ars Goetia is a well-known book about demonology written in Mediaeval Latin. I'm having trouble analyzing the grammatical structure of the title. Ars is a feminine noun in the singular nominative form....
8
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1answer
733 views

Unde “-cundus”?

I have learned that there is a suffix -cundus, found in words like fecundus, jucundus/jocundus, and rubicundus, which means something like "full of" or "characterized by." It seems to often be ...
5
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1answer
222 views

When were trivialis and quadrivialis introduced?

The seven liberal arts were divided into trivium and quadrivium. The easier half, trivium, gives rise to the adjective trivialis, which has connotations of simplicity and vulgarity. The adjective ...
8
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1answer
89 views

Quo modo Latine redditur “fool proof”?

Quo modo expressio Anglica "fool proof" Latine reddi potest? Nullum idioma Latinum significatione simile scio. Eandem rem Latine exprimere possum, exempli gratia dicendo "perbene munitus", sed malim ...
11
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1answer
245 views

Why do some 2nd decl. “-er” adjectives and nouns drop the “e” in the stem?

Is there any rule explaining why certain second-declension nouns and adjectives with a nominative -er ending drop the e when declined (e.g. ager, liber, pulcher), and why others keep it (e.g. puer, ...
17
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3answers
2k views

The best way to say *interesting* in Latin

It's sometimes difficult to convey some meaning in such an old language as Latin. I have trouble with the word interesting. I've heard someone say iucundus in this meaning, but it's not an accurate ...
32
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2answers
648 views

What gender should a predicate adjective be to agree with a series of things with different genders?

I'd like the translate the following sentence into Latin: Pompeii, Rome, and Herculaneum are visited by the boys. However, since these three cities have different genders, I'm struggling to choose ...

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