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Questions tagged [accusativus]

For questions about the accusative case.

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1answer
56 views

What does “Filiane” mean?

I am learning Latin from Collar and Daniell's FIRST YEAR LATIN. In LESSON IV: THE GENITIVE CASE TO DENOTE POSSESSION, an exercise is given (sentence translation). Some examples: Līberatne? Līberō, ...
35
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4answers
911 views

Accusative equals nominative for neuter words – how universal is this and why?

The first mnemonic for Latin case ending I learnt was that for neuter words, the accusative form is always identical to the nominative form. This applies even to exotic word endings like animal or id, ...
6
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4answers
504 views

Why nominative instead of accusative with verb “sum”?

Recently I've been learning about the accusative case, in/direct objects and in/transitive verbs. In light of this, consider the phrase: Nilus fluvius est I'm interested in the rationale (...
4
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1answer
276 views

Audire, with accusative or dative?

The verb audire is many times (if not most of the times) found with an accusative. For example, in the Vulgata, 4 Regum, 22:11 says: et audisset rex verba libri legis Domini, scidit vestimenta sua. ...
6
votes
1answer
132 views

In memoriam: why not “in memoria”?

Consider this usual example of Latin+English: As Wiktionary states, in memoriam literally means "into memory" (memoriam is in accusative case). However, as Wiktionary (above) and Wikipedia state, the ...
5
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4answers
252 views

Why use nominative in Coniugatio periphrastica passiva?

Why do we use the nominative case in this example: Liber legendus est. = The book needs to be read. If liber is a direct object, then why not put it in accusative?
4
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3answers
95 views

When to use accusative and nominative?

I am having some difficulty figuring out the Latin translation for the following sentences: My favourite animal is a dog. Will dog (canis) be considered as nominative or accusative (canem)? I want a ...
12
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2answers
452 views

How do we know that Italian words come from accusatives, not ablatives?

I have been told by several sources that Italian nouns and adjectives that originate from Latin come from accusative forms. Also the final -m is lost and an u becomes o. For example, caro > carnem > ...
4
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2answers
296 views

Did Latin have any ergative verbs?

An "ergative verb" is a verb that can either take two nouns (a subject and an object) or only one (a subject), where the object of the two-noun form corresponds to the subject of the one-noun form. ...
6
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2answers
137 views

When are -ns words used with accusative direct objects?

In English, one common generalization is that "-ing" words only take direct objects when they are verb forms, not when they are true adjectives or true nouns. (There are only a few possible exceptions,...
5
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1answer
126 views

Accusative in genitive relative clause with verb finiebat

I am working on Satyricon, currently chapter 30, and have stumbled upon a passage with a grammar that baffles me: Et quod praecipuē mīrātus sum, in postibus triclīniī fascēs erant cum secūribus ...
6
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1answer
98 views

Why would the prae­po­si­tion “per” ᴇᴠᴇʀ take an ab­la­tive in­stead of an ac­cu­sa­tive com­ple­ment?

ᴘᴇʀ + ᴀʙʟ.: Bar­bar­ism, solœ­­cism, or di­a­chron­ic evo­lu­tion? Lewis and Short clear­ly state that per is a prae­po­si­tion whose nor­mal com­ple­ment is in the ac­cusative. With­out hav­ing dol­...
5
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1answer
443 views

Why is the accusative not used in Judges 5:23?

This verse reads: Maledicite terrae Meroz, dixit angelus Domini : maledicite habitatoribus ejus, quia non venerunt ad auxilium Domini, in adjutorium fortissimorum ejus. The context is that of ...
4
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3answers
1k views

Why is an accusative mode needed?

Consider Deuteronomy 28:30, in the Vulgata: Uxorem accipias, et alius dormiat cum ea. Domum ædifices, et non habites in ea. Plantes vineam, et non vindemies eam. So uxorem, domum, vineam, and eam ...
5
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1answer
100 views

Regarding the mode of “terram” in Deuteronomy 28:38

Deuteronomy 28:38 reads: Sementem multam jacies in terram, et modicum congregabis: quia locustæ devorabunt omnia. I think the first phrase before the comma has the following structure (but ...
6
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2answers
817 views

Is “servos” accusative plural in Plautus's “is est servos ipse” and, if that's the case, why does “esse” takes accusative case there?

I have some troubles in understanding the syntax of a sentence from Plautus's Captivi, line 580; I need to add glosses. The sentence is "Nam is est servos ipse, neque praeter se umquam ei servos fuit"....
4
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1answer
121 views

Is there such a thing as the accusativus cum participio (a.c.p)? If not, what is this? (Greek)

This is not a hermeneutics question, but rather, a Greek grammar question inspired by a verse from the Bible. Adverbial clauses are common to English, Ancient Greek, and Latin, and I believe there is ...
10
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4answers
1k views

Is the complement of esse in nominative or accusative when esse is a subject?

Suppose I want to say something like "I like being a human". There are undoubtedly several ways to phrase that in Latin, but I want to do it so that it the subject is "to be a human". The complete ...
12
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3answers
705 views

What is an Adverbial Accusative?

In book II, line 141 of Vergil's Aeneid (shown at the end of the question), my notes describe the first word 'quod' as an 'adverbial accusative', but no explanation as to what that means. So my ...
6
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2answers
218 views

Is “ire” used correctly here? “Iosaphatum salutem ite.”

Can ire be used in this way? "Iosaphatum salutem ite." (I go to Iosephat for shelter.) Furthermore, is the two accusatives correct? This sentence is based on a Sanskrit construction, and I do not know ...
6
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1answer
58 views

Can any verb which means “to go (to somewhere)” be used in a double-accusative construction?

Can any verb which means "to go (to somewhere)" be used in a double-accusative construction? Like dīcō? Can I use any particular verb for "to go" preceded by two accusatives and have the sentence be ...
13
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1answer
143 views

Can a verbum deponens go along with an accusativus?

In Plinius I encountered: "Confitentes iterum ac tertio interrogavi supplicium minatus" Is supplicium some sort of accusativus belonging to minatus, which comes from deponens minor? If a form is ...
9
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1answer
1k views

When to use the Greek accusative?

The Greek accusative or the accusative of respect (accusativus Graecus or accusativus respectus) is used like the ablative of respect (ablativus respectus). This construction is a loan from Greek, ...
3
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1answer
4k views

Why is “Bonam Fortunam” the correct way to wish someone good fortune instead of “Bona Fortuna”?

I remember being told this by a Latin teacher, but I have since forgotten the details. Why should I use the accusative case instead of the nominative here?
11
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2answers
3k views

Happy Birthday and the accusative of exclamation

I'd like to say "Happy Birthday [to you]!" in Latin. I see two possibilities in Traupman's Conversational Latin: Fēlīx nātālis tibi! Fēlīcem nātālem [tibi exoptō]! The first is used in ...
9
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1answer
385 views

Difference between Vocative and Accusative usage

What is the grammatical difference between saying something like Bonam Fortunam (in the accusative) and Bona Fortuna (in the vocative) to another person? I have always heard the former, and I do not ...
4
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1answer
366 views

eadem mutata resurgo

What is the role of eadem mutata in this phrase? I'm guessing either neuter plural accusative of extent, or feminine nominative as apposition to an implied ego. The original context of this line is ...
10
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1answer
154 views

Accusativus 'Graecus' pertinetne ullo modo ad accusativum temporis?

Confer exempla haec: Vinctus pedes senator fugere non potuit. Augustus multos annos regnans rem publicam sibi subiecit. Accusativus Graecus a Graecis esse dicitur. Discentes linguam Graecam ...
14
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1answer
669 views

Why did Medieval Latin use “ad” with the accusative instead of just using the dative?

Part of Documents of Medieval Latin (page 14) states several differences between Classical Latin and Medieval Latin. One is an increased use of prepositions where Classical Latin used a simple ...