Questions tagged [accusativus-cum-infinitivo]

For questions about the accusativus cum infinitivo structure.

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Why is this indirect command not expressed with "ut" + subjunctive?

In chapter XXVII of Lingua latina per se illustrata. Familia Romana I've learned that indirect commands are expressed with ut + subjunctive. For instance, in lines 109–110, we find Colōnō imperat ut ...
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Why is "cum" used in this sentence from "De Bello Gallico"?

This sentence comes from Caesar's De Bello Gallico (emphasis mine in the part I'm trying to understand): Dum haec a Caesare geruntur, Treveri magnis coactis peditatus equitatusque copiis Labienum cum ...
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Does the AcI permit the use of adjectives?

My question stems from a passage in Lingua Latina Per Se Illustrata Familia Romana in chapter 12 on page 90 beginning at line 117 as follows. << "Mīles Rōmānus, quī hostem armātum ...
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Is this a perfect passive infinitive with "esse" omitted?

The following sentence comes from lines 8-9 of chapter XXIII of Lingua latina per se illustrata. Familia Romana: Tantum sciō epistulam Tūsculō missam et ā tabēllariō ad tē lātam esse. I'm trying to ...
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Is this construction "accusativus cum infinitivo"?

In chapter XXI, lines 115-116, of Lingua latina per se illustrata. Familia Romana (page 167) there is this sentence: Nōn difficile est mātrem Mārcī fallere! Its meaning is clear to me, but I'm not ...
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Resources for usages of "accusativus cum infinitivo"

Where I can find a comprehensive explanation of the different usages of the "accusativus cum infinitivo" structure? In my Latin grammar book, I've found that it's used with verba dicendi (...
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Why is accusative pronoun "te" used in this construction?

In lines 137-138 of chapter XIII of Lingua latina per se illustrata. Familia Romana one can read: Iam necesse est tē dormire. I don't understand why the accusative pronoun tē is used in the above ...
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lūna 'nova' esse dīcitur

In LLPSI Familia Romana, there is the following sentence: Cum exigua pars lūnae tantum vidētur, lūna 'nova' esse dīcitur. I don't understand why the subject of the verb "esse" is not in ...
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How would you say "I heard old war drums beat." in Latin?

See this question on English Language Learners StackExchange for context. My attempt to say it in Latin would be "Audivi vetera belli tympana tunsa fuisse.". Is that correct?
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Is this really a nominativus cum infinitivo? "Parentes adire…prohibentur"

This worksheet by Robin Meyer offers the following sentence as an example of a nominativus cum infinitivo: Parentes adire ad filios prohibentur. (Cic. Ver. 2.5, 117)Parents were prohibited to see ...
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LLPSI: "Mārcus Quīntum ad terram cadere uidet."

I am attempting to come to a elementary understanding any clauses in the Latin sentence "Mārcus Quīntum ad terram cadere uidet" on page 73 in the work entitled "Lingua Latina Per Se ...
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Is "regem" the subject of both "evasisse" and "adisse" in this passage by Theodoricus Monachus?

The sentence is from the book "De antiquitate regum Norwagiensium", and was written by Theodoricus Monachus. Ibi tunc quidam dicunt regem scapha evasisse et ob salutem animae suae exteras ...
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What is the correct way to show the Passive Perfect Infinitive in a textbook?

I have come across the Passive Perfect Infinitive and my current textbook represents it as a nomative participle + esse (e.g. salutatus esse). However on the internet I mostly see it represented as an ...
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Hearing vs hearing that

The English sentence 'I heard you play the flute' can have three distinct meanings: At some point in the past, you played the flute while I was within earshot. Someone told me that you are able to ...
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Accusative case marking of subjects in infinitival clauses

The present question is based on a previous discussion with Draconis and on a previous question raised by Joonas. The Accusativus cum Infinitivo (AcI) construction is often regarded in linguistics as ...
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Accusativus cum Praedicativo

I've been reading The Early Latin Verb by Wolfgang David Cirilo de Melo, where in a footnote he writes: Synchronically, the participle here is best analysed as an elliptical perfect passive ...
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How to say indirect speech + "there is/are" in latin?

I only know to say the "there is/are" in latin we use "est/sunt" , but how about when it is part of indirect speech? E.g " He/she said that there is (something) " I'm ...
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Does word order lessen the ambiguity in Accusativus cum Infinitivo?

A question was recently asked about how to say "I thinks he loves me" in Latin, because the most straightforward translation is ambiguous as to who may be loving who: Puto eam me amare In ...
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How do you say "I think she loves me" in Latin?

Im confused when it comes in two accusatives in indirect statements. How do I say "I think she loves me" without sense of "I think I love her"? I get the translation as - Cogito/...
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Why does this sentence have an ablative subject for an indirect subordinate clause?

In this sentence, hoc anno is the subject of esse, so I expect it to be in the accusative, "hunc annum". Also, futura should agree in gender to annus, masculine. What am I missing? (If it's ...
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Confusion between Direct Speech / Subordinate Clause(s) / Indirect Speech

In the 2011 re-make of "Ben Hur" Pontius Pilate (Hugh Bonneville) advised a colleague that Caesar was not about to return a job to him, to which he is unsuited, which he cannot do. The first ...
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Memento Mori: Indirect Speech

In Q: Memento Mori--Revisited I attempted to develop the idea of C. M. Weimer that "Memento Mori" could be translated indirectly, giving "Remember that you can die"; improving, hopefully, to "Remember ...
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Switches Between Direct & Indirect Speech in Suetonius-Supplemental

Suetonius, Caius (Caligula) 58: concerns the assassination of Emperor Caius (Caligula) on January 21st., AD 41. At this point, the assassins have struck the first blows and Caius, still alive, ...
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Switches between Direct & Indirect Speech in Suetonius

Suetonius, Caius (Caligula) 58: alii [tradunt] Sabinum summota per conscios centuriones turba signum more militiae petisse et Gaio 'Iouem' dante Chaeream exclamasse: 'accipe ratum!' ...
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Accusative--Infinitive Construction

Lucretius, De Natura Rerum: Liber Secundus; L177–181 contains this sentence: nam quamvis rerum ignorem primordia quae sint, hoc tamen ex ipsis caeli rationibus ausim confirmare aliisque ...
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How is a counterfactual thought expressed in indirect speech?

Suppose we had this sentence: Hannibal Romanos vicisset, nisi plurimi elephantes periissent. Now let's put this in indirect speech: *Credo Hannibalem vicisse. We want to say, "I believe that ...
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Unsure about my translation of "se una cum propinquis et amicis eorum ... dolere dixit"

On its December 23rd broadcast, Nuntii Latini had this to say about Angela Merkel. Angela Merkel, cancellaria foederalis Germaniae, se una cum propinquis et amicis eorum, qui strage Berolinensi ...
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Is the complement of esse in nominative or accusative when esse is a subject?

Suppose I want to say something like "I like being a human". There are undoubtedly several ways to phrase that in Latin, but I want to do it so that it the subject is "to be a human". The complete ...
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How to choose tense of conjunctive in a clause subordinate to an accusativus cum infinitivo structure?

The tense for a conjunctive predicate in a subordinate clause can be chosen following the consecutio temporum rule. The tense depends on the tense of the main clause. But how to choose the tense when ...
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