Linked Questions

4
votes
0answers
62 views

Rules of syllabification [duplicate]

In Latin Grammar, Robert J. Henle wrote (p. 2), Accent. a. In words of two syllables the accent is on the first. vía; béllum b. In words of more than two syllables, if the second last ...
4
votes
0answers
53 views

Pronunciation when adding -que [duplicate]

Wheelock's Latin says: In a word of two syllables the accent always falls on the first syllable: sér-vō, sáe-pe, ní-hil. In a word of three or more syllables, the accent falls on the next to ...
41
votes
6answers
21k views

Why is the Roman acronym SPQR and not SPR?

SPQR stands for "Senātus Populusque Rōmānus". It would be logical (at least in English or Spanish) to expect the initialism or acronym to be SPR. However, the first letter of the conjunction "-que" is ...
20
votes
4answers
907 views

Why do some Latin adverbs have accent on the last syllable?

In the opening chapter of De Musica (written 387-391), St. Augustine gives an example of a Latin oxytone, i.e. a word with accentual stress on the ultimate syllable: MASTER: Now when we pronounce ...
6
votes
4answers
1k views

Latin phonetic dictionary

I'm starting to learn Latin on my own and I have trouble with pronouncing words correctly very often. Does anyone know of a Latin dictionary with the IPA transcriptions of Latin words, preferably with ...
7
votes
2answers
148 views

Accents in compound words and words with enclitics

I've been learning Latin on my own for the last 4 months or so using Wheelock and Moreland & Fleischer. I've not been able to find answers to the following accentuation questions in either of ...
3
votes
1answer
109 views

How do we know where the Roman prose stress was?

I have been taught that the stress in classical Latin is on the second last syllable if it is long and on the third last syllable otherwise. In two-syllable words the stress is on the first syllable. ...
8
votes
1answer
123 views

Were enclitics considered part of a word for stress purposes?

One rule of Latin stress is that it can never go farther back than the antepenult: the third syllable from the end. For example, we have cár-men "song", cár-mi-ne "with a song", and car-mí-ni-bus "...
8
votes
1answer
101 views

Stressed syllables in certain prefixed verb forms

I've managed to confuse myself about which syllables to stress in prefixed verbs of two syllables, the first one being short (e.g. circumdare or alloquor). Do I stress the penultimate syllable in each ...
1
vote
2answers
77 views

Do contracted perfects have long or short vowels?

Many verbs have a suffix -v- in the perfect tense, which tends to disappear (or "contract" or "syncopate") before the ending: amā- > amāvisti > amāsti "you loved", audī- > audīvisti > audīsti "you ...
3
votes
1answer
91 views

The Name Timedeus

In a previous question of mine (The Name Amadeus) a fine fellow (code name: "sumelic") conjectured that the name Amadeus comes from the phrase "Ama Deum" ("Love God") with the suffix -us added to ...
3
votes
0answers
64 views

How do we know how -iī and -iit perfects were stressed?

The question Are there exceptions to the Latin stress rules? has an answer by Joel Derfner saying that the first-person singular perfect forms dormiī, audiī, veniī (for dormīvī, audīvī, venīvī) have ...