Linked Questions

6 votes
3 answers
512 views

Domino notus erat: Agent ablative without a preposition?

I am reading the LLPSI excerpt of Rhetorica ad Herennium (in LLPSI: Sermones Romani, Chapter Ostentator Pecuniosi). Near Line 64, Ørberg wrote a margin note: pro notitia domini: quia domino notus ...
Kotoba Trily Ngian's user avatar
9 votes
3 answers
391 views

Parsing "oblita carmina"

Vergil wrote (Eclogues IX.51–4), quoted by Draconis in this answer: Omnia fert aetas, animum quoque. Saepe ego longos cantando puerum memini me condere soles. Nunc oblita mihi tot carmina: vox quoque ...
Ben Kovitz's user avatar
8 votes
2 answers
606 views

On the (typical?) ambiguity of "Porta clausa est"

It is often said that Porta clausa est can have two readings depending on the categorial nature of the participle: verbal (cf. clauditur/clausa est) or adjectival (cf. clausa est/clausa fuit), which ...
Mitomino's user avatar
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6 votes
2 answers
402 views

"ne paelici suspectaretur" (Tacitus)

Tacitus, Annales 4.3: pellit domo Seianus uxorem Apicatam, ex qua tres liberos genuerat, ne paelici suspectaretur. The translation on Perseus (Church and Brodribb) gives: Sejanus, to avert his ...
TKR's user avatar
  • 31.4k
6 votes
2 answers
367 views

Can the gerundive be used like an adjective?

Can I use a gerundive like I would use an adjective as in the following example? It sounds fine to me, but I am somewhat suspicious; my intuition has failed before. Infans lavandus clamabat. The ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
9 votes
2 answers
397 views

"Interdum sane, qui cogitare se dicit nondum constitutum sibi certi quidquam fatetur"

In the Thesaurus of Iohannes Matthias Gesnerus under cogito: (clearer link) inter cogitare et deliberare hoc interest, cogitare est dubitare, deliberare, confirmare. Haec Nonius 5,28. Interdum sane, ...
d_e's user avatar
  • 11.2k
7 votes
2 answers
265 views

How does one know when adjectives and participles are used dominantly?

Adjectives and participles can be used dominantly: aethere summo - (not: the highest heaven, but:) the highest point of heaven mediis ... Achivis: the middle of the Greeks virgine caesa: the murder ...
Nick Decroos's user avatar
6 votes
1 answer
459 views

How to analyze and translate "non se luxu neque inertiae corrumpendum dedit" (Sal. Jug. 6)?

By taking a look at various translations of the sentence in bold below, which is excerpted from a famous portrait of Jugurtha by Sallust, one could infer that the datives luxu (cf. luxui) and inertiae ...
Mitomino's user avatar
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5 votes
2 answers
392 views

Null expletive objects in Latin? "Cariotae cum ficis certandum habent" (Plin. Ep. 1,8)

How is the gerundive construction to be analyzed in the following example? Cariotae cum ficis certandum habent. (Plin. Ep. 1,8) 'Dates have to fight with figs'. Could you please provide me ...
Mitomino's user avatar
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8 votes
1 answer
723 views

Can Gerundives be predicates of Ablative Absolutes?

I was wondering if Gerundives, the verbal adjectives referred to as "future passive participles" by Latin grammarians, can appear as predicates of Ablative Absolute constructions. As is well-known, ...
Mitomino's user avatar
  • 8,911
5 votes
1 answer
343 views

How would you say "I think our stick insect will die by me giving it to our hamster to eat."? Can you use absolute ablative to mean a cause of death?

My attempt would be: "Ego censeo nostrum phasmidum (insectus qui ut baculum parvum videtur) moriturum esse me danti eum nostro criceto, ut cricetus noster eum voret." But I don't know ...
FlatAssembler's user avatar
9 votes
0 answers
603 views

On the syntax of some datives in a beautiful Ciceronian structure

I was wondering if you would like to share your thoughts on the grammar of the datives in the following texts from Cicero. The second example is a very interesting one provided by Kingshorsey in an ...
Mitomino's user avatar
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6 votes
1 answer
206 views

Shouldn't this *illis* be in the genitive *illorum* in here?

In the famous Caesar's sentence: *Perfacile factu esse illis probat conata perficere, propterea quod ipse suae civitatis imperium obtenturus esset: non esse dubium quin totius galliae plurimum ...
hellofriends's user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
334 views

How obligatory is the predicate in a dominant participle construction?

Typically, so-called "dominant" participle constructions (aka Ab urbe condita constructions; AUC for short) are defined by saying that the predicative participle is compulsory, whereby it cannot be ...
Mitomino's user avatar
  • 8,911
4 votes
1 answer
200 views

Greek "datives of agent" in Latin classical prose?

When including the following poetic examples from Horace and Ovid in what turned out to be a long answer to a previous post on datives of agent, I made this hesitant remark: Perhaps I'm wrong but I'd ...
Mitomino's user avatar
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