Linked Questions

16
votes
2answers
586 views

Why do we say that an ablative absolute has a participle?

An ablative absolute consists of a noun in the ablative and a participle modifying it. Except that that's not really the case. We frequently find the participle replaced with just an adjective (or ...
5
votes
4answers
760 views

Translate “Eat, Drink, and be merry” to Latin

In the spirit of the holidays, I was thinking about how you would say Eat! Drink! Be Merry! in Latin (or written as Eat, drink, and be merry!). There are multiple words for each, but I'm not sure ...
5
votes
3answers
2k views

Latin Translation for “Death to the enemies of mankind”

I'd like to translate "Death to the enemies of mankind" into Latin. How can I do that? If there are multiple ways of saying it, I would like it structured as close to a motto as possible, since that's ...
5
votes
4answers
319 views

Why use nominative in Coniugatio periphrastica passiva?

Why do we use the nominative case in this example: Liber legendus est. = The book needs to be read. If liber is a direct object, then why not put it in accusative?
8
votes
2answers
529 views

When can the gerund take an object?

Typically the gerundive is employed when one using a gerund with an object seems possible. For example, I have understood that aqua bibenda est and rei faciendae causa are preferable to aquam bibendum ...
5
votes
2answers
305 views

Null expletive objects in Latin? “Cariotae cum ficis certandum habent” (Plin. Ep. 1,8)

How is the gerundive construction to be analyzed in the following example? Cariotae cum ficis certandum habent. (Plin. Ep. 1,8) 'Dates have to fight with figs'. Could you please provide me ...
5
votes
3answers
331 views

On the absence of impersonal passives of deponent verbs

In a previous post there's a discussion on an intriguing example of a passive construction of a transitive (allegedly) deponent verb: Ab amīcīs hortārētur (Did Latin have any ergative verbs? ). The ...
3
votes
3answers
356 views

Mihi legendum/legenda est?

I've another question about Coniugatio periphrastica passiva. If I'm a girl and I wanted to say I need to read, would it be: Mihi legendum est. Or Mihi legenda est. So, does the gerundivum ...
2
votes
0answers
237 views

“Tears in rain” monologue in Latin

I've just read a Latin translation of the famous "Tears in rain" speech in the Blade Runner film. See its source in: I've seen things... "I've seen things you people wouldn't believe. Attack ships ...
2
votes
1answer
232 views

Gerundial arguments selected by verbs taking Genitive: e.g., “Memento moriendi”? “Me paenitet vivendi”?

As a follow-up of two previous questions on Latin grammar, I was wondering if examples like Memento moriendi (cf. Memento mori) and Me paenitet vivendi (cf. Me paenitet vivere) are also attested. ...
4
votes
0answers
163 views

World War One: Opening Moves

On Q "We Are Triumphant While Our enemy Sleeps" the comment was made: "Remember the Schlieffen Plan? Brilliant; inspired gamble; but, it could have only have worked if the belligerent nations had ...
1
vote
1answer
77 views

I am looking for the Latin translation for 'these are the good times' As in enjoy right now and live in the moment. can anyone help?

I am looking for the Latin translation for 'these are the good times' As in enjoy right now and live in the moment. can anyone help?
4
votes
1answer
40 views

Can ‘per’ occur with accusative gerundium?

In my grammar (Samson Eitrem: Latinsk grammatikk, 3rd edition, by Bjørg Tosterud and Egil Kraggerud, Aschehoug, 1996), under § 146 Gerundium, he states that: Akkusativ brukes etter preposisjonene ad ...
3
votes
0answers
105 views

When and how did the distinction between the gerund and the gerundive develop?

The gerund and the gerundive look similar and have similar meanings, but they are still distinct as any Latin grammar will tell us. But how did classical Latin come to have these two close but ...