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In A new latin composition by Charles E. Bennett one may find following statement to translate into latin (from Lesson IV):

This circumstance made the troops more courageous.

My attempt at translation is:

Res haec milites fortioribus egit.

I used fortior in ablative, however I don't know whether it is correct.

This leads to the more general question: what should be the case of the adjective Z in "X made Y (more) Z" construction?

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I would use facere and accusative instead of agere and ablative:

Res haec milites fortiores fecit.

However, a literal translation of "to make something something" is not the only option. I would phrase the cause as a causal ablative. (Note that it is the cause, not the outcome, that is in ablative in this approach.) For circumstances I suggest rerum condicio, but there are other options. My offer for a translation is:

This circumstance made the troops more courageous.
Milites rerum condicione fortiores erant.
(lit. "The soldiers were more courageous due to the circumstances.")

Many choices are a matter of style. The most important correction to your attempt is a grammatical one: fortiores should not be in ablative. If you make something something directly, both somethings are in accusative. In passive they are both in nominative (milites fortiores facti sunt).

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    Thank you for your answer. If you make something something directly, both somethings are in accusative. In passive they are both in nominative (milites fortiores facti sunt). This is quite strange for me - it's good to know. – PrzemysławP Sep 30 '18 at 10:29
  • @PrzemysławP I'm glad to be able to help! Judging by your Polish-sounding name and what little I remember of Russian, I suspect your surprise is due to Slavic influence. Latin seems to be more fond of double accusatives than Slavic languages. – Joonas Ilmavirta Oct 1 '18 at 3:37
  • Indeed, in Polish it would be a strange and wrong sentence with double accusative. – PrzemysławP Oct 1 '18 at 14:23

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