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I heard it claimed recently that Ancient Greek had a verb similar to irrumāre, but specifically for irrumātiō performed on a corpse.

This seems somewhat absurd, and the claim had no source attached, which makes me skeptical. But on the other hand, Greek allows quite extensive compounding, comic poets have covered stranger topics, and ῥαφανιδόω is attested. And I have no proof that such a verb didn't exist.

Is such a grotesquely specific verb attested? And if so, where/in what context was it actually used?

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No, I will not censor my response.

Bain, David. “Six Greek Verbs of Sexual Congress (βινω̑, κινω̑, Πυγίζω, ληκω̑, Οἴϕω, Λαικάζω).” The Classical Quarterly, vol. 41, no. 1, 1991, pp. 51–77. JSTOR, argues that even the two instances in Classical Greek claimed to mean "face-fucking", βινεῖν στόματι and λαικάζω, don't—that the former refers to cunnilingus, and the latter is overimaginative parsing of Aristophanes.

The only references to irrumatio/"oral rape" in Sexuality in Greek and Roman Literature and Society: A Sourcebook are Latin. And I don't see any obvious indication from Adams' The Latin Sexual Vocabulary of a Greek antecedent.

W. A. Krenkel, 'Fellatio and irrumatio', Wissenschaftliche Zeitschrift der Wilhelm-Pieck-Universität Rostock 29 (1980), pp. 77ff. is going to be very difficult to track down, and it's always hard to prove a negative. But I don't see any good evidence for this claim.

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