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So, I took a couple years of Latin in school, but it's been awhile. I was trying to create this motto, and I'm not sure if I'm declining the nouns properly. Also not sure I remember if word order is important.

This motto is pretty NSFW, so, you have been warned.

In Mentulīs Fēminārum Crīsāte

The intended translation in English is:

Grind on the Dicks of Women. Or, roughly, Ride Girl Cock.

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    I hate to think what your coat of arms will depict. Do you really think it a suitable question for th[s forum? – Tom Cotton Jun 14 '18 at 5:46
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    A raven, a heart, a book, and a floppy disk. Suitable? Are the people who frequent this forum not up for answering the question? If you know of somewhere I can ask this question of more serious students of Latin, I'm all ears. – Jessica Jun 14 '18 at 16:51
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    It's hard to say too much without knowing what it is that you're trying to express, but what you have is almost certainly incorrect. In the first place, the verb crisare is (at least in classical Latin) intransitive; so it can't take an accusative direct object, which is what mentulas appears to be. Also, mentula is (again, at least in classical Latin) the male sexual organ specifically; so mentulas feminarum seems suspect because, based on the forms, it's saying that the feminae are the possessors of the mentulae. – cnread Jun 14 '18 at 17:11
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    If you want help with a translation, you should always explain in the question what it is that you are trying to achieve, instead of just giving your attempt without telling what it attempts to say. If you want to hide something from accidental view, start a paragraph with >!. // Users here certainly have the aptitude to help with your translation problem. Whether they want to help with this specific topic (or perhaps vote down or to close) is up to every user to decide. – Joonas Ilmavirta Jun 14 '18 at 20:52
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    @TomCotton It's an unconventional question, but it does certainly seem to be on-topic as defined in the Help Center (asking for help with a translation), and it's no more obscene than the worst of Catullus. If I remember right, Martial even has an epigram specifically about this topic. – Draconis Jun 15 '18 at 10:46
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Your overall phrasing seems reasonable, though the words ceveō and crīsō are rare enough that I've never seen them used with any description of an object (even in the entirety of the Packhum corpus). The main questions are to do with vocabulary.

Mentula is a very standard obscene word for the male genitalia. Alternatives include verpus (specifically when erect) and pēnis (slang, but common enough that Cicero notes it couldn't be used for its original meaning any more). Alternatively, Martial has a satirical epigram about a woman penetrating another woman (I.90). He uses the word landīca "clitoris", though this word was never found in any of the other poets, and seems to have been incredibly obscene. (It's not that it's just rare, because it's also found in various graffiti, and Cicero (Ad Familiares 9.22) comments on a scandal when someone said it in the Senate by accident.)

Fēmina is a somewhat scientific word for "woman", used in biology and grammar. Alternatives include uxor (literally "wife") and mulier (the most common out of the three). But rather than using the genitive for this, I would go with an adjective: muliebris "of a woman, feminine" or fēminīnus (less common and more technical).

Crīsō is a rather rare word, but is definitely attested. Crīsō means to take an active role while being penetrated vaginally; ceveō means the same thing anally. Or maybe crīsō was always used for women and ceveō with men: the words aren't common enough to be sure (since e.g. there's no instance of either being unambiguously used for anal sex with a woman). Both are typically translated as "ride" in English.

  • Since adjectives have to match the case and number of the nouns they describe, if I wanted to keep mentula, would In Mentulīs Muliebribus Crīsāte be correct? – Jessica Jun 15 '18 at 17:21
  • @Jessica Yep, looks right to me – Draconis Jun 16 '18 at 2:56

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