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I love the Stoic doctrine and I would like to know from the original text (see excerpt under), the sentence that can capture the essence of one of the Stoic doctrine, that can be translated in modern language as : "'to be chosen' but not 'to be desired.'"

From De Finibus III.6:

Sed ex hoc primum error tollendus est, ne quis sequi existimet, ut duo sint ultima bonorum. Etenim, si cui propositum sit conliniare hastam aliquo aut sagittam, sicut nos ultimum in bonis dicimus, sic illi facere omnia, quae possit, ut conliniet huic in eius modi similitudine omnia sint facienda, ut conliniet, et tamen, ut omnia faciat, quo propositum adsequatur, sit hoc quasi ultimum, quale nos summum in vita bonum dicimus, illud autem, ut feriat, quasi seligendum, non expetendum.

From an English translation (just the end of the text):

"his 'ultimate End,' so to speak, would be what corresponded to what we call the Chief Good in the conduct of life, whereas the actual hitting of the mark would be in our phrase 'to be chosen' but not 'to be desired.' "

Maybe this sentence captures the idea?

ut omnia faciat, quo propositum adsequatur, sit hoc quasi ultimum, quale nos summum in vita bonum dicimus, illud autem, ut feriat, quasi seligendum, non expetendum.

What do you think? And what is a literal translation of this Latin passage?

How can you specifically translate "to be chosen but not to be desired" in "Cicero's style"?

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I guess that Cic. de Finibus IV, xvii [48] may be near to what you are looking for:

ea, quae secundum naturam sunt, petenda, sed ab iis et appetitio et actio commovetur,

If that isn't the exact reference, then I'm afraid that to locate the exact sentence would need either luck, or some closer reading than I have time to give it.

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