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These are from a novel written in my native language. This is a fantasy novel with a fictional world, in which there's a language, which isn't elaborated IRL but it has some "Latin-sounding" words, e.g. in the in-world versions of the mentioned sentences. I'm just curious how they sound in the real Latin. I translated these sentences from my native language to English, only for this reason.

1. My place is by the side of the Empire.

2. I'm waiting for my punishment.

3. My blood and marrow are yours. Do with them what you will.

Originally, this isn't an English quote, neither is it from an official translation. Literally it should be:

My blood and marrow is yours. Do with it what you will.

"Blood and marrow" refers to one's life, this is the resason of the the singular, but I don't know whether it would be possible in English and/or Latin.

  • Hello, and welcome to the site! Could you please provide more context as to why you need these translated? Also, it is part of the site guidelines that you provide evidence of self-translation. We would love to help, but we are not just translators! Again, welcome to the site, and I hope you find that for which you are looking. – Sam K Mar 4 '18 at 4:39
  • These are from a novel written in my native language. This is a fantasy novel with a fictional world, in which there's a language, which isn't elaborated IRL but it has some "Latin-sounding" words, e.g. in the in-world versions of the mentioned sentences. I'm just curious how they sound in the real Latin. I translated these sentences from my native language to English, only for this reason. Sorry for the confusing description. – Vysotsky Mar 4 '18 at 6:27
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These are my attempted translations:

  1. Locus meus prope imperium est.

  2. Me manebit supplicium. Or, more literally: Poenam meam exspecto.

  3. Tua est vis vitae meae. Cum ea fac ad libitum.

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    The other ones look good, but I'm not sure I understand me manebit supplicium. Can you explain how it works? – Joonas Ilmavirta Mar 16 '18 at 11:25
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    In the entry for the verb maneo, my dictionary cites "Te manebit supplicium" as an example meaning "punishment is imminent for you." – Carlos Arturo Serrano Mar 17 '18 at 13:27
  • Thanks! I find the literal translation better for the context of the sentence. "Waiting" refers to a conscious acceptance, i.e.: "I accept the consequences (whatever they will be), I don't fight against them." – Vysotsky Mar 17 '18 at 15:09
  • My usage of a Latin/Spanish dictionary may have contributed to the confusion. In Spanish, expect, hope, and await are one single word. – Carlos Arturo Serrano Mar 17 '18 at 15:35
  • And maybe it would have been better if I had used "expecting" instead of "waiting". Btw how could you translate "My blood and marrow are yours. Do with them what you will."? – Vysotsky Mar 18 '18 at 19:28

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