1

That is it. What would be the Greek for "Pigasus"? Does one simply replace the eta in "Πήγασος" for an iota?

By "Pigasus" I refer to this:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pigasus_(literature)

So, a transliteration into Koine Greek would be just great!

Thanks in advance for your help.

  • 3
    Welcome to the site! This question looks promising, but more context would help: (1) What do you mean by Pigasus? The pig that ran for president or something else? (2) Where do you want to use it? In some contexts transliteration like you suggest is good, in others there might be better options. (3) What kind of Greek do you want it in (modern, old, other)? I've understood that in modern Greek eta and iota are pronounced the same, so the pun might be lost. – Joonas Ilmavirta Feb 16 '18 at 9:35
  • Support the creation of a Greek language stackexchange by committing to it here: area51.stackexchange.com/proposals/101509/… – jknappen - Reinstate Monica Feb 17 '18 at 17:17
  • I will do so... – Jamai-Con Feb 20 '18 at 19:34
7

You could certainly replace the eta with an iota, as you suggest, yielding Πίγασος. Alternatively, if you want to reflect the wordplay of the English somewhat, you could do something like Πηγασῦς, replacing the σος element of the usual word with σῦς, an alternate form of ὗς (which, at least in Homer, can refer to the domestic pig, even though it refers to the wild swine elsewhere).

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