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I'm considering getting a tattoo with the phrase "Seize the loyal" in Latin, but I'm not 100% how to translate it. I am trying to get at something like "keep the loyal close" but it can be a very loose translation. I was also trying for something like Carpe diem, where it has a meaning beyond its literal translation.

My first guess was Carpe fidelis based on Carpe diem and Semper fidelis, though diem is a noun and fidelis is an adjective so I'm not sure what difference it makes.

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    Welcome to the site! Can you explain what you want to mean by "seize the loyal"? The best translation will depend on context, so any kind of explanation or back story will help you get more appropriate answers. For example, carpere is a very broad word, but I guess it's not the optimal choice for you. – Joonas Ilmavirta Oct 6 '17 at 22:04
  • I think you're on the right track, but honestly, "seize the loyal" in English means "capture anyone who is loyal." That can't be what you want to say. – C. M. Weimer Oct 6 '17 at 22:05
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    I am trying to get at something like "keep the loyal close" but it can be a very loose translation. I was also trying for something like Carpe diem, where it has a meaning beyond its literal translation. – James Fenwick Oct 6 '17 at 22:12
  • For comparison: I Thes 5.21 "omnia autem probate quod bonum est tenete " hold fast what is good. – Hugh Oct 7 '17 at 3:06
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Pliny writes:

“colere amicos,” Plin. Ep. 7,

which means: colo (Lewis and Short) to 'to look after your friends, appreciate them, value them.'

Fidos from fidus means 'faithful, trustworthy, dependable.' So fidos 'the loyal.'

My suggestion would be "colere fidos"

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    Cole fidos for the imperative. – C. M. Weimer Oct 7 '17 at 16:04

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