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I am a research student from India. I work on cicada systematics and some of the literature on cicadas is in Latin. This one of such literature was written in 1866 and it is very important at this point for me to have its English translation as one of my manuscript has been pending due to this. I would really appreciate if someone could help me with this. I will be really grateful!

Here's a transcript of the lines that need to be translated.

Capite thoracis antico latitudine æquali, margine antico inter frontem et lobos verticis libere prominulos profunde inciso, parte laterali oculos semiglobosos ferente sursum nonnihil vergente fronte paullo prominula; rostro brevi; ocellis ab oculis quam inter se duplo longius remotis; alis areolis apicalibus quinque.

Capitis parte laterali horizontali, nec sursum vergente.

Here is a screenshot:

Image of the lines

  • Is there any way you could check that Rustia is not a misprint for Rustica ? – Hugh Sep 16 '17 at 13:02
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    Are the 5 spots on the wings (areolis) usually called 'spots,' or 'eyes,' or 'nipples' ? Also, rostro brevi, is the conventional term "short beak," or "short mouthparts," "proboscis" ? This is the main problem for the non-specialist. – Hugh Sep 16 '17 at 13:15
  • Rustia is probably right after all. Carl Stål (21 March 1833 – 13 June 1878) was a Swedish entomologist specialising in Hemiptera. In 1866 he was describing so many new species he must have run out of names. – Hugh Sep 17 '17 at 11:42
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    Sorry for the delay in responding. It is Rustia for sure. This transcript is basically describing the genus. – Kiran Sep 22 '17 at 10:19
  • Is there a broader description which introduces group? Or, is there a description which precedes '1' in this sequence? The taxonomy seems to have changed since Stål discovered this single example of Rustia. – Hugh Sep 22 '17 at 15:52
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Rees Cyclopedia 1819, and therefore superceded by your source, does not list Rustia in the five pages (11 columns) on Cicada. However it does list Rustica with this description by Fabricius, in the fifth section: Genus Cercopis Fabr.

Rustica, Grey; immaculate, wings white; Fabr. An European species, found on plants.

The name Rustia looks odd to me, I would suspect it to be a misprint for Rustica. However Fabricius does not seem to be describing the same species, except that some of his specimens were very damaged, from private collections. The following translation has a number of words which most likely have conventional meanings, but you may be able to improve it with your knowledge of the terminology. Apicalis (conical) and Lobus (lobes) are not in my dictionaries and may be modern Latin.

75 (76) Capite thoracis antico latitudine æquali,

With the head equal in breadth to the anterior of the thorax,

margine antico inter frontem et lobos verticis libere prominulos profunde inciso,

with the anterior margin between the forehead and the clearly prominent lobes of the top of the head deeply furrowed, ( libere (clearly) literally =outspokenly) (margine antico might be better as 'front edge')

parte laterali oculos semiglobosos ferente sursum nonnihil vergente fronte paullo prominula; rostro brevi;

with the lateral part which carries the hemispherical eyes turning somewhat upwards with the brow very slightly prominent; the mouth-parts short;

ocellis ab oculis quam inter se duplo longius remotis; alis areolis apicalibus quinque.

the simple eyes twice as far from the compound eyes as the distance between them; the wings with five small conical areas.

76 (75) Capitis parte laterali horizontali, nec sursum vergente.

The lateral part of the head horizontal, and not turning upwards.

  • Thanks a lot for the translation. This makes sense. Does he mention anything about abdomen? – Kiran Sep 22 '17 at 10:22
  • if not, would you help me with one more transcript? The description of the ventral side of the abdomen is what I am looking for! – Kiran Sep 22 '17 at 10:24
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As a forewarning, I'm not particularly familiar with 19th century Latin, and some features of this text seem very odd to me (such as everything being in the ablative). There were also a few words I couldn't find in my dictionaries.

Capite thoracis antico latitudine æquali,
The head and the front of the thorax equal in width,

margine antico inter frontem et lobos verticis libere prominulos profunde inciso,
the front edge between the forehead and the rather prominent lobes on top of the head [unknown word] is deeply cut;

parte laterali oculos semiglobosos ferente sursum nonnihil vergente fronte paullo prominula;
the part on the side bearing hemispherical eyes bending upward somewhat, projecting out just a little from the forehead;

rostro brevi;
a short beak [i.e. short mouthparts?];

ocellis ab oculis quam inter se duplo longius remotis;
eyelets twice as far away from the eyes as [the distance] between themselves;

alis areolis apicalibus quinque.
on the wings are five apical [spots? literally small open places or gardens].

Capitis parte laterali horizontali,
The part on the side of the head [is] horizontal,

nec sursum vergente.
rather than bending upward.

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    I think it's ablativus qualitatis, as in: Haec est cicada capite (...) equali, margine antico (...) inciso... Perhaps you could also read it as a comitative ablative. Either way, this can translated by adding "with"s. – Joonas Ilmavirta Sep 17 '17 at 7:25
  • Thanks a lot for the translation. This makes sense. Does he mention anything about abdomen especially of the ventral side? – Kiran Sep 22 '17 at 10:22
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    if not, would you help me with one more transcript? The description of the ventral side of the abdomen is what I am looking for! – Kiran Sep 22 '17 at 10:24
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    @KiranMarathe Certainly, if you have an image or a transcription of it. – Draconis Sep 22 '17 at 15:30

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