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I'm formatting some letters we're reading this semester in my Latin class in Word so I have more space to annotate. I need to keep track of which text in my Word doc is on which page of the book the class uses.

So if I'm referring to "p. 46 (continued)", how ought I translate that continued? I've looked at some dictionaries, and I've seen exsecutus and iugis, but they don't necessarily seem correct for this usage.

This "continued" for the header at the top of each letter. For example, Pliny's Epistles Book II Letter XVII is very long (over 1100 words) and thus, it crosses several pages in Whitton's edition of Book II. When I'm making my version, I want to be able to know what page of Whitton each passage is on, so I might label a section of Letter XVII as "p. 61 – XVII (continued)" to show that XVII began several pages ago.

  • Welcome to the site! This might be just my being slow, but can you explain what "continued" is supposed to mean? Do you use it to denote page changes ("this is where page 46 starts in the book") or something else? It looks more like "this text (on page 57) continues a story that was interrupted on page 46 of this document", but your description points in a different direction. If you can show an example of this English usage of "p. 46 (continued)", that would help. – Joonas Ilmavirta Sep 9 '17 at 20:26
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    It's for the header at the top of each letter. For example, Pliny's Epistles Book II Letter XVII is very long (>1100 words) and thus, it crosses several pages in Whitton's edition of Book II. When I'm making my version, I want to be able to know what page of Whitton each passage is on, so I might label a section of Letter XVII as "p. 61 - XVII (continued)" to show that XVII began several pages ago. – Jack Gallagher Sep 9 '17 at 21:38
  • Thanks for the explanation! Now I understand what you're after. I took the liberty to edit that into your question. Feel free to re-edit if you want to. – Joonas Ilmavirta Sep 9 '17 at 21:55
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    Seems this question is pertinent: latin.stackexchange.com/questions/5220/… – C. M. Weimer Sep 12 '17 at 2:15
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I suggest using the adjective continuus. It has a number of different meanings, including things like "continuous" or "uninterrupted". Therefore, I would translate "page 61, [letter] XVII (continued)" as "pagina 61, [litterae] XVII (continuae)". The adjective should agree with the noun "letter".

To get rid of agreement problems, you can also consider the corresponding adverbs continue and continuo. Other similar adverbs include continuanter and continuate.

The last two adverbs come from the derived verb continuare. The passive participle continuatae has essentially the same effect as continuae. Also the passive [litterae] continuantur ("[letter] is continued") is possible if you prefer a personal verb form.

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pp. 46 sqq. = "pagina 46 et sequentes".

page 46 and the following pages.

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    To me, this sounds like something you would put on a page to indicate that it represents notes for page 46 and several other pages, whereas the question sounds like taking page 46 of the original text and spreading the notes for said page over several pages, if that makes any sense. – Sam K Sep 9 '17 at 21:31

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