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What is the most accurate translation to English of this expression

FACIAM UT POTERO

I think this appears in some Ovidius's poem and is a motto of an school of lawyers in Spain.

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I would translate that as "I will do as I can". Perhaps "I will do all I can" or "I will do as well as I can" would be more idiomatic English, albeit less direct.

You have two verbs in future tense: faciam (I will do) and potero (I will be able to). Between then is ut, which has a number of meanings. The meaning intended here seems to be that of a relative adverb (see the entry L&S, meaning I.B). In this use it is essentially synonymous with eo modo quo, and I translated it as "as".

It seems that Ovidius used potero five times, none of which matches the motto. Instead, the phrase seems to be from Cicero's Cato Maior de Senectute, paragraph 7.

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