3

Campbell p. 122 has this poem as fr. 98. The first "wannabe" tercet has only one line in Campbell. Bibliotheca Augustana reports the poem with two "blank" lines at the start, and also offers the image of one of the source papyri, P.Hauniens., source for the first 12 lines. The papyrus evidently starts with what is l. 3 in the Campbell-B.A. text, and it even has white space above, indicating that it was probably the top of whatever it was in (e.g. papyrus scroll). So we'd have to assume that either two (or more) lines weren't even written on the papyrus, or that some other part of it (another column, e.g.) contained those line, and the scribe decided to make a column-break-like thing in the middle of a tercet. Couldn't that just be the first lie, and the meter be as below?

–ux xx–uu–ux
xx–uu–ux
xx–uu–ux

What is the reason people assume those two lines were lost and the meter was as follows?

xx–uu–ux
xx–uu–uc
–ux xx–uu–ux

I mean, if the following meter is accepted for Campbell's fr. 96:

–ux xx–uu–ux
xx–uu–ux
xx–uu–u–u–x

why can my proposed meter not be the actual meter of fr. 98?

  • Note: for any Americans around here, metre should have a synonym of meter. I mean, I typed mete and nothing popped up, and I almost thought there was no such tag! – MickG Jun 28 '17 at 20:54
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    You have the privilege to create new tags. If you want to have a tag called "meter", go ahead and create it by adding it to your question. It can then be synonymized (or probably merged) with the older tag. // Added later: I merged the two tags right away since they are so obviously identical. This caused the new tag to disappear from your question. Now if you type "mete", the tag "metre" will be suggested via the alternate name "meter". – Joonas Ilmavirta Jun 28 '17 at 20:58
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    Sappho frag. 98 has been extensively discussed, as pretty much everything written by Sappho. One of the most recent serious articles is by Professor Camillo Neri (Dipartimento di Filologia Classica e Italianistica, Università di Bologna) - see Neri 2012, Non c’è mitra per Cleide (Sapph. fr. 98 V.) – Alex B. Jun 29 '17 at 2:58

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