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Salvete, omnes:

I studied Latin in college, but it has been a few years since I was immersed in it. I'm trying to wrangle a translation for the motto of an American Air Force search & rescue unit:

These things I do, so that others may live.

My attempt so far:

Haec facio, ut alios... (?)

Pretty straightforward in English, but now I think I'm remembering that Latin has no future subjunctive mood. "I do X, so that Y may happen in the future."

How would you render this verb indicating future purpose?

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This is a simple purpose clause, and so you'll want to the present subjective, ut alii vivant. (Note that you'll want to turn the accusative alios into the nominative alii since it's the subject of the purpose clause.) There's already a future aspect to the subjunctive present, so there's no need for further differentiation.

For more information, check out Allen and Greenough § 531.1, with the example given:

ab arātrō abdūxērunt Cincinnātum, ut dictātor esset (Fin. 2.12), they brought Cincinnatus from the plough that he might be dictator.

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    For some reason I read "so that others may live" more like ut alii vivere possint than ut alii vivant. Do you think posse would be an idiomatic addition? – Joonas Ilmavirta Feb 17 '17 at 8:56
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    @JoonasIlmavirta I don't think there's any need for that at all. It depends on what you're emphasizing. See Allen and Greenough § 531.1: "ab arātrō abdūxērunt Cincinnātum, ut dictātor esset (Fin. 2.12), they brought Cincinnatus from the plough that he might be dictator." – C. M. Weimer Feb 17 '17 at 15:09

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