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The word "anser" (goose) is usually derived irregularly from Proto-Indo-European *gjhh2ens, with an unexplained loss of 'h' at the beginning. I am wondering, has any etymologist considered the possibility that "anser" doesn't actually come from there, but that it is related to "anas" (duck)?

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    Where would the s in anser come from? The s in anas is the nominative ending; the stem is anat-.
    – Cairnarvon
    Commented Jan 11 at 15:46
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    more critically, anser has a long a in the first syllable, where anas has a short one
    – Tristan
    Commented Jan 12 at 10:30
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    (although a suffix beginning with t, and then loss of the medial a could potentially explain both issues, but that requires just as many unexplained irregularities than linking anser to goose does)
    – Tristan
    Commented Jan 12 at 10:32
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    @Tristan A vowel before -ns- is always long (and probably nasalized).
    – Cairnarvon
    Commented Jan 12 at 15:24
  • @Cairnarvon ah yep, good point
    – Tristan
    Commented Jan 12 at 15:29

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