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I'm attempting to create a Latin motto or saying to be used in a short story that I'm writing and want to ensure that it makes grammatical sense. I've attempted to figure this out by myself, but just wound up confusing myself.

The first phrase I have in mind is "In Life; Strife; In Strife, Knowledge." The idea behind it being that though there may be struggles in life, moments of struggles or discord, there are still lesson of life and of knowledge generally that can be learnt. The best that my neophyte self can come up with is 'In Vīta, Pugnae; In Pugna, Doctrinae' though I'm certain this is wrong.

The second is "Curiosity vanquishes ignorance" or 'Curiosity restrains ignorance'. The meaning of which is more obvious than the former. The best I can guess is 'Studium vīcī īnscītia' or 'Studium vincīre īnscītia'.

I'm certain that none of my attempts at English to Latin translations are correct, as there is more about Latin grammar and syntax that I am completely unaware of, and so would greatly appreciate any help.

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  • If you're writing macrons, vīta should be vītā (and pugna pugnā), since the ablative has a long a. The i in doctrīnae is also long.
    – Cairnarvon
    Jan 11 at 8:38

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I would say

In vita, difficultas; in difficultate, doctrina (or doctrinae if you meant plural).

I think Pugna,ae refers more to physical battles or arguments, while difficultas, -atis refers to difficult situations, struggles.

Then:

Studium inscitiam vincit (3rd person singular present).

Studium means more commitment, love, devotion or enthusiasm for something.

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    I wonder if plural difficultates might not be better here, since there would be many different types throughout life.
    – cmw
    Jan 10 at 18:17
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    @cmw In vita, difficultates; in difficultatibus, doctrina. It could be an interesting option.
    – Davide
    Jan 10 at 18:26

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