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Boolean logic has logical gates which have the following truth tables:

NON gate:

Input Output
0 1
1 0

AND gate:

Input A Input B Output
0 0 0
0 1 0
1 0 0
1 1 1

NAND gate:

Input A Input B Output
0 0 1
0 1 1
1 0 1
1 1 0

OR gate:

Input A Input B Output
0 0 0
0 1 1
1 0 1
1 1 1

NOR gate:

Input A Input B Output
0 0 1
0 1 0
1 0 0
1 1 0

XOR gate:

Input A Input B Output
0 0 0
0 1 1
1 0 1
1 1 0

NXOR gate:

Input A Input B Output
0 0 1
0 1 0
1 0 0
1 1 1

There are a total of seven logical gates: non, or, nor, and, nand, xor and negated xor. What would their names be in Latin? My thoughts so far are:

  1. NOT: nón gate
  2. AND: et gate
  3. XOR: aut gate, because I understand that aut is the exclusive or of the Latin language.
  4. OR: sive gate, because it looks like sive can be used in non-exclusive ors.
  5. NOR: neuter gate, because it looks like neuter does the job of describing how it works.
  6. NAND: neuter gate, also because it looks like neuter does the job of describing how it works.
  7. NXOR: negatum aut gate, because looks like no language has this conjunction.

If George Boole were to born in the days of the Caesar himself, how would have called the logical gates?

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    Two questions: (1) Why this list of six? You're missing, for instance, "NOR," and you mix 1-input (NOT) and 2-input (the rest) logic gates; (2) Are you looking for Latin-derived names that would be used in an English textbook? Your final question about Caesar makes me think that you want a translation into Latin of the whole concept--but your attempts include an English word ("gate").
    – brianpck
    Dec 5, 2023 at 14:19
  • @brianpck (1) nor is just a multi entry not, and of the 8 possible symmetric two-entry gates, only 6 are meaningful the other two are the always on and the always off. (2) I did not take the time to translate the gate part.
    – Dolphínus
    Dec 5, 2023 at 15:31
  • The N in NAND just stands for NOT, so NAND is just NOT AND. The same goes for NOR and NXOR. So I want to suggest you use "porta negata" or something for all of these functions. Dec 19, 2023 at 10:40

1 Answer 1

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As far as I know, the names, especially the abbreviated ones you list, are always in English whether or not the surrounding text is in English. Technical abbreviations like this tend to be universal, and it helps experts move between languages.

I would do the same in Latin, so the only task is to translate "gate". But that's easy: porta is a well established word for the traditional kind of gate.

Thus my suggestion is to say things like porta XOR, with the noun in the correct case and number. This inflection makes usage easy for both writers and readers, and the well established abbreviations make the message clear.

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  • I have a secondary goal of establish the technical names in a more well seen language (at least for me) than english
    – Dolphínus
    Dec 5, 2023 at 15:59
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    @Dolphínus For a point of comparison, Finnish is way further from English than Spanish is, and we still use the English gate names. The abbreviations don't even have to mean anything to a Finn; they are names rather than words. As a scientist, I think it makes for genuinely better communication to not change the names. Many readers will encounter these things in many languages and universal notation helps a lot. Also, establishing new nomenclature is very, very hard; it's unlikely to stick.
    – Joonas Ilmavirta
    Dec 5, 2023 at 16:05
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    It sticks in someone that hates English like me.
    – Dolphínus
    Dec 5, 2023 at 16:13
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    @JoonasIlmavirta Well, let me introduce you to Fonction ET, Fonction OU and all their cousins ;-) Dec 6, 2023 at 0:22
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    @SebastianKoppehel, Joonas, Dolphínus: FWIW in Spanish I've seen them taught in English and Spanish, depending on context. In electrical engineering they are nearly always in English, in mathematics/logic their equivalent is more prone to Spanish or maybe to both languages.
    – Rafael
    Dec 6, 2023 at 14:54

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