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I came across this phrase in Historia Hierosolymitana by Baldricus Dolensis (c. 1050–1130): omnibus dehiscens offendiculum. What does this sentence mean? I would appreciate any help.

Here is more context in case it helps:

Qui præ nimia tristitia, strictim complosis manibus et stridentes dentibus ingemiscebant. Labebantur equi in immane præcipitium, et trames artissimus pepererat/præparabat omnibus dehiscens offendiculum. Multi vel equis, vel clitellariis, cum rebus superpositis, illic amissis, pauperati sunt.

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    Where is this from? Do you have any context? – TKR Nov 25 '16 at 20:32
  • I study on this text : Baldricus Dolensis (c.1050–1130), Historia Hierosolymitana – turuncu Nov 25 '16 at 20:43
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    Can you add that information to the question? Your own thoughts on translating would be good to have, too, whatever they are. That helps write an answer that helps you. – Joonas Ilmavirta Nov 25 '16 at 20:49
  • How does the English sentence "The narrowest road prevent/hinder to all men" relate to the Latin one? Is it a translation (by you, Google or something else) or some kind of context? – Joonas Ilmavirta Nov 25 '16 at 20:55
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    Thank you for providing more context! I reformatted your question. Feel free to edit again if you want. – Joonas Ilmavirta Nov 25 '16 at 21:28
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Let me translate sentence by sentence. Second opinions (and answers) are welcome.

Qui præ nimia tristitia, strictim complosis manibus et stridentes dentibus ingemiscebant.
They groaned because of too much grief, clapping their hands tightly and creaking their teeth.

This may or may not be idiomatic English, but I hope the message is clear.

Labebantur equi in immane præcipitium, et trames artissimus pepererat/præparabat omnibus dehiscens offendiculum.
Horses fell down an enormous cliff and the extremely narrow path created a wide obstacle for everyone.

This sounds like a problem at a mountain path. Horses fall down and a part of the path collapses, leaving a wide gap in the path. Offendiculum means an obstacle, and in this context I think it is more likely to be a hole than a block on the road. Dehiscens is the present participle of dehiscere, "to open up". Either the path opens up and produces the obstacle, or the obstacle produced by the path opens up. I cannot tell for sure whether dehiscens modifies trames or offendiculum. It does not really make a big difference for translation or interpretation, though.

Multi vel equis, vel clitellariis, cum rebus superpositis, illic amissis, pauperati sunt.
Many lost horses or pack-saddles and the things on them and were thus impoverished.

People's possessions fell down and were lost. I am not sure if it means short term possessions like travel gear or long term possessions if they were traveling with all they got. As with the previous sentences, more context would help me find the most suitable translation, but this level of accuracy might be enough.

In this context, I might translate the key phrase omnibus dehiscens offendiculum as "a gaping obstacle for everyone" or something in that direction. Or perhaps even "a hole in the path that no one could pass", depending on how you want to use the translation.

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    Thank you Mr Joonas IImavirta for your help. I can translate other sentences but "omnibus dehiscens offendiculum" is very troublesome. Thank you again – turuncu Nov 25 '16 at 21:31
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    Artissimus = extremely narrow (artus). – TKR Nov 25 '16 at 21:34
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    @turuncu, I'm glad if I could help. For future questions like this (and why not this one, too), I suggest adding your own translations of the surrounding text. That would achieve two things: Answering becomes easier and people see that you genuinely want to solve the problem but could not make it yourself. – Joonas Ilmavirta Nov 25 '16 at 21:36
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    @TKR, thanks! Will edit. I wonder why I missed that word in two dictionaries. – Joonas Ilmavirta Nov 25 '16 at 21:36
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    I wonder if there are many other situations where both altissimus and artissimus would make sense. (And not only to Elmer Fudd.) – Joonas Ilmavirta Nov 25 '16 at 21:39

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