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In Portuguese, popcorn is "Pipoca" from Old Tupi pi'poka pira(skin) pok(burst) Since latin has borrowed some words(not to mention greek) Could we have it as a borrowed word? Pipoca is a female noun in Portuguese. It could perfectly be from the first declension.

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    For what it's worth, Traupman has maizium inflatum for popcorn. I suppose it's plausible pipoca could have entered Portuguese from neo-Latin, which would have got from the Tupi, but I don't see why Portuguese couldn't have borrowed it direct from Old Tupi.
    – Figulus
    Commented Feb 9, 2023 at 22:44
  • Traupman? I pass. They say "Pipoca" even in Portugal. Wouldn't it be easier just to latinize a foreign term?
    – user11898
    Commented Feb 10, 2023 at 0:01
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    Random idea, but what if you coined something using nux? My thinking is the Romans, not being familiar with corn, might have thought of the kernel as a nut.
    – Adam
    Commented Feb 10, 2023 at 1:36
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    They knew the millet(milium)its grains can be poped. I used to eat it when my father worked on a farm. It's like a tiny popcorn. And a funny fact: the Portuguese word for corn 🌽 is "milho" wich came from "milium" perhaps the romans never imagined that if the heat a grian in oil, it could be popped.
    – user11898
    Commented Feb 10, 2023 at 1:58
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    From the Morgan-Owens Neo-Latin Lexicon: "343 corn: popcorn maizium* inflâtum (HELFER) ► maizium displôsum ►► LRL: maizae grana tosta. EL: pop-corn, maïs éclaté; pop corn; palomitas, alborotos, cabritas; Popcorn" (neolatinlexicon.org/adumbratio-old)
    – Herodotean
    Commented Feb 12, 2023 at 23:27

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