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Accusative for dative with "latere" in Medieval Latin? From: Dolopathos sive de rege et septem sapientibus of Joannes of Alta Silva (c. 1200); in "A Primer of Medieval Latin" by Charles H. Beeson" ; Page 98, line 29.

"Quod tamen eum non latuit, quia iam antea ...."

If "eum" (acc) was used with "latere" in ML for "ei" (dat) in CL, then it could be translated as ".....it was not unknown to him ....."; yet I don't see this mentioned in the summary of medieval grammar in the introduction of Beeson's book.

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    Since latuit can take an accusative in Classical Latin, I don't see why it wouldn't be able to in Medieval Latin. Do you have a question implicit in your post?
    – Figulus
    Sep 27, 2022 at 21:55
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    Figulo assentior, proprium medii aevi non est, quamquam insolita erat constructio apud scriptores classicos, et haud vane dicunt Lewis & Short apud Ciceronem eam numquam inveniri ("mostly poet. and in post-Aug. prose; not in Cic."). Sep 27, 2022 at 22:19
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    Thanks Figulus and Mr. Koppehel. I would be happy to credit your answers if you posted them as such. Sincerely, Sep 28, 2022 at 18:19

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Since latuit can take an accusative in Classical Latin, I don't see why it wouldn't be able to in Medieval Latin. Do you have a question implicit in your post? – Figulus Sep 27 at 21:55 2

Figulo assentior, proprium medii aevi non est, quamquam insolita erat constructio apud scriptores classicos, et haud vane dicunt Lewis & Short apud Ciceronem eam numquam inveniri ("mostly poet. and in post-Aug. prose; not in Cic."). – Sebastian Koppehel Sep 27 at 22:19 Thanks Figulus and Mr. Koppehel. I would be happy to credit your answers if you posted them as such. Sincerely, – Stephen Bryant

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