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I pondered this since reading some Plautus. It seems similar to postea (post ea), just being in singular (so post id?), or perhaps it is the obsolete earlier form of post itself. Just curious if there is a definite consensus on this word's etymology.

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    Can you give an example of where you found postid? Searching Plautus, I'm only seeing postidea, not postid on its own.
    – Draconis
    Aug 23, 2022 at 18:51
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    Sure, I encountered it in the prologue of Casina, lines 32-34: Deiphilus hanc graece scripsit, postid rursum denuo latine Plautus cum latranti nomine. (Text from Loeb Classical Library) Aug 24, 2022 at 16:36
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    Interesting! I don't have a proper answer yet, but I do want to note that other editions have post id there.
    – Draconis
    Aug 24, 2022 at 17:06
  • Ah! It mostly looks like a typo! I ran the form, postid, in the Latin concordance tool and found no match, but did find plenty of the form, post id, with that space. But this does beg an additional question: How does postea become generally a compound and not post id? Aug 25, 2022 at 17:50

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