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"detrahentem", though a present partiple and therefore active, (it seems to me) is used passively (like the past participle "detractum". .... Something like "She stuck the nail that had been (passively) pulled out with the wooden cup back into the grimy wall.

Guidance, please

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  • 2
    Can you post the full sentence?
    – TKR
    Jun 14, 2022 at 21:31
  • Tum clavum, qui detrahentem secutus cum camella lignea fuerat, fumoso parieti reddidit. Jun 15, 2022 at 3:15

1 Answer 1

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I'm guessing this is the sentence you're talking about:

Tum clavum, qui detrahentem secutus cum camella lignea fuerat, fumoso parieti reddidit.
Then [Oenothea] replaced the nail, which had followed [her] pulling [it] down with the wooden cup, in the smoky wall.

The key is that quī is nominative, while detrahentem is accusative, so it can't be modifying the nail itself. Secūtus fuerat is the main verb here, and takes an accusative object: whatever is detrahentem is being followed.

So my interpretation is that the nail had followed (secūtus fuerat) an unspoken "her", pulling down an unspoken "it", with the wooden cup (cum camellā ligneā).

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  • I like this. Thanks. Jun 15, 2022 at 2:45
  • 1
    @StephenBryant If this answered your question, you can click the green check mark to the left, which will mark it as "accepted".
    – Draconis
    Jun 15, 2022 at 3:58
  • Done. Interum tibi gratias ago. Jun 16, 2022 at 2:30

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