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The proceedings in Manorial Courts in England before 1733 were recorded in Latin. I'm currently transcribing and translating a set of such documents dated 1699 (to the best to my ability -- I last studied Latin 47 years ago, and that was Classical Latin, so my grammar is a little rusty, and my cases might not match -- yet!). The translation needs to convey the sense of the document, not necessarily be a word for word translation, but I need to understand each word/phrase to be sue I'm not missing any legal/historical nuances.

I'm making reasonable progress, referring to online Latin dictionaries and also to reference books specifically about Manorial Records in Latin. It also helps that Manorial Court Rolls are quite repetitive; it doesn't help that they use quite heavily abbreviated/contracted words.

However I have a couple of places (so far) where I either can't identify a word, or can't translate it.

1.

Extract from Manorial Roll

My transcription for this reads (with names removed at the request of the person who holds the documents, and with the problematic word highlighted in bold):

[Habend et] Tenend Cotagium pred ac premissa pred[icta] cum pertinen[tiae?] prefat[?] A B filia C et D fratri ip[s]ius A pro ter[mi]no vitar[um] ear[um] et iujuslibet eor[um??] diuti[us?] viven[tium?] successive

The rough sense of this is that a lease is being granted on a previously mentioned Cottage with land and other appurtenances (also previously detailed) to 'the aforesaid A, B daughter of C, and D the brother of the same A for the terms of their lives', but I need that missing word to complete the last phrase '??? longest living of them successively'?.

(For background, this is often referred to as a Lease for Lives, the lease lasting until the last of the named individuals has died).

2.

Extract from Manorial Court Roll

I have (again with problematic element highlighted):

cepit extra manus D[omi]ni extradico[?]ne Senesca[lli?] pred[icti?]

and my translation:

'He took from the hands of the Lord [of the Manor] ??? the Aforesaid Steward'

The Lord of the Manor was not present at the Court so the Cottage was handed over by the Steward; presumably the bit I can't identify explains why/how but I can't make out the Latin.

2 Answers 2

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Partial answer (to question 1:) blushing because of my schoolgirl error.

iujuslibet turns up in a lot of Latin documents online. However, looking for it in a dictionary requires it to be typed in as iusiulibet (any man or perhaps any one). So my literal translation of:

[Habend et] Tenend Cotagium pred ac premissa pred[icta] cum pertinen[tiae?] prefat[?] A B filia C et D fratri ip[s]ius A pro ter[mi]no vitar[um] ear[um] et iujuslibet eor[um??] diuti[us?] viven[tium?] successive

is now:

To have and to hold the aforesaid Cottage and aforesaid premises and aforesaid appurtenances A, B daughter of C, and D brother of A himself for the terms of their lives and any of them living longer in succession.

or more colloquially:

A, B daughter of C, and D brother of A himself [are] to have and to hold the previously mentioned cottage, premises and appurtenances for the term of the life of the longest lived among them.

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  • 1
    Isn't it cujuslibet, the genetive of quilibet "anyone"?
    – Colin Fine
    Commented Jan 30, 2022 at 23:42
  • @ColinFine that could make more sense, especially when I compare the first letter with the first letter of consuet later on which I know is a c. Commented Jan 31, 2022 at 9:03
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And an answer to question 2:

cepit extra manus D[omi]ni extradico[?]ne Senesca[lli?] pred[icti?]

The problem phrase is 'ex tradicione' (2 words not one) and in this context means 'by grant', so in full;

He took from the hands of the lord [of the manor] by grant of the aforementioned seneschal.

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