6

May there be an acronym, an abbreviation for the term «as is», «as it is»? The context the term used: to leave as it is, remain unchanged.

P.S.: Found a word stet, which translates to let it stand.

6
  • 3
    FWIW, there is the fixed latinism sic (thus, this way, that way) used in writing after quoting something literally, especially to justify what you consider wrong or outdated orthography or grammar. It comes from sic erat scriptum, which could be (a bit freely) translated as 'this is how it was written'
    – Rafael
    Oct 13 at 21:52
  • I think you should write stet into its own answer, since I think it's a better option than any of the others (including the one you've accepted).
    – dbmag9
    Oct 14 at 10:10
  • 5
    Some more context (like an example) would definitely help here. Oct 14 at 12:36
  • @FedericoPoloni there's no literal context since it's planned to be used further like in code annotations for future self.
    – chzzh
    Oct 15 at 10:28
  • 1
    @chzzh Could you write an example of code annotation then? With the literal code and the comment you'd like to add to it. Make one up with a "hello world" if you haven't any real code at the moment. Oct 15 at 12:09
4

As you have found for yourself, a very suitable choice would be stet. This is a subjunctive 'let it stand' or 'it should stand'.

In the comments it was clarified that the intended use here is code annotations, which makes stet even more appropriate since it has a history of being used as annotation while editing a document. Typically the proofreader/editor might indicate a change they thought was suitable, but if the author disagreed with the change they would write stet indicating that the original should remain without the changes.

4
  • Curious, did you intend to make this community wiki?
    – cmw
    Oct 15 at 21:08
  • @cmw It felt appropriate since it was the OP's answer, taken from where they edited into the question.
    – dbmag9
    Oct 15 at 21:29
  • It's up to you, but although the suggestion is OP's, the explanation is yours and so you deserve just as much credit. I can reverse the wiki-ization if you'd like, but as I said, up to you.
    – cmw
    Oct 15 at 23:31
  • @cmw Happy for you to reverse the CW-ization, thank you for offering. :)
    – dbmag9
    2 days ago
7

You could consider in statu quo ante, "in the state in which it was before".

1
  • 3
    Not the biggest fan of doing so, but this could potentially be made into a proper acronym: ISQA.
    – cmw
    Oct 13 at 20:49
5

Since you're asking on this particular stack, I imagine you're looking for specifically a Latin phrase that can be used or abbreviated in English.

With those criteria, the best I can think of is in situ, literally "in place" but generally meaning something more like "unmodified" or "undisturbed".

1
  • Seems even more suitable for code. Anything could be shorter than "leave in situ"?
    – chzzh
    Oct 13 at 20:46

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.