5

In this example, what would make more sense:

MITTE MIHI PICTURAM PRODUCTI

or

PICTURAM PRODUCTI MIHI MITTE

3
  • 2
    This isn't directly related to your question, but if you're trying to say 'Send me a picture' = 'Send a picture to me,' ME is incorrect; it should be MIHI. Otherwise, neither version makes much sense in Latin, regardless of word order.
    – cnread
    Jul 15 at 17:02
  • Ahh my bad. Edited the question. Thank you. Jul 15 at 18:04
  • Is there really such a thing as "the regular SOV order" in Latin? Statistics would be useful.
    – fdb
    Jul 18 at 11:14
8

Generally, imperatives go first, even though verbs usually go last of all in sentences or clauses. It's correct either way, but the imperative is an important part of a sentence so it gets precedence.

Allen and Greenough's Latin Grammar says:

The verb may come first, or have a prominent position, either (1) because the idea in it is emphatic; or (2) because the predication of the whole statement is emphatic; or (3) the tense only may be emphatic.

Since the imperative is the point of the sentence, it often precedes everything else, unless you want emphasis on something else.

The future imperative forms, which aren't common and are dated, only usually used in statutes and laws, often come last of all in a sentence, just as a normal verb often does.

I'd check out Allen and Greenough's Latin Grammar if you want to see about syntax and other things yourself. It's usually a very concise yet in-depth look at Latin grammar, and they give plenty of examples in their sections on the imperative and word order. You can find an online version here.

4

Both are the same when translated literally, but from my experience, Imperative verbs go before. Then again, different people have different writing styles, so that needs to be taken into account.

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