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Rebeginner here (I studied Latin decades ago at school).

I was just wondering whether there were any sources where you can find some Latin classical poetry texts with scansion added by people who know. I have searched but found nothing.

Or failing that, maybe a quite long guide, encompassing some "difficult cases"?

Recommendations re offline resources (aka books) would be helpful too.

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Dickinson has an excellent resource for beginners:

https://dcc.dickinson.edu/ovid-amores/scansion

They've been hard at work at getting a lot of resources for students on their website, like Allen and Greenough.

One resource I've long used is Rudy Negenborn's Catullus site, where, besides including different translations, he has all of Catullus scanned, too.

http://rudy.negenborn.net/catullus/text2/sc1.htm

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  • Thanks. That Catullus site is useful, but unfortunately he doesn't show the caesura (I assume the metre there is of a type with caesurae... all Alexandran hexameters?). May 30, 2021 at 18:19
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    @mikerodent I don't remember my Catullus well enough (and I never paid that much attention to scansion at school) but Catullus 1 is in hendecasyllables; I think that's true for a lot of his writing.
    – dbmag9
    May 30, 2021 at 18:21
  • @mikerodent Yes, not every meter will have caesura. Caesuras are also either a) fairly easy to spot with punctuation, or b) often completely ambiguous. If there is space in the third foot, it's probably going there, unless there's a good reason to put it in the fourth. But otherwise the meter is there for you.
    – cmw
    May 30, 2021 at 18:38

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