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How would the phrase "Vi veri vniversum vivvs vici" be written in Classical Latin? As far as I know, it is by Christopher Marlowe, originally written as Vi veri vniversum vivus vici, used in the play called Doctor Faustus. I would like to know how hypothetically I could illustrate this sentence for a Roman, a speaker of classical Latin, and how it would look when carved in stone or how it would be spelled or how it would be converted to a more classical form, without losing semantics.

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    Welcome to the site! Can you please edit your question to elaborate what you are after? I am not sure if "written in classical Latin" means how it would look when carved in stone or how it would be spelled or how it would be converted to a more classical form or something else. I will close the question for now, but it can be reopened for others to answer once clarified.
    – Joonas Ilmavirta
    May 18 at 14:03
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So it actually comes from Aleister Crowley, not Christopher Marlowe.

The sentence isn't ungrammatical or particularly un-Classical (except that this sort of stylism is rare and more akin to the older Latin of the comic poets).

If you were to write it out on stone, depending on the time and context, you would get something that looked similar to:

VI·VERI·VNIVERSVM·VIVVS·VICI

The interpuncts wouldn't always be there. Sometimes the long I would be elongated. But otherwise if an ancient Roman saw that, they could understand it just fine.

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