2

There is one existing question on the SE (search for 'ae pronunciation'), but there are nothing equal to my interests.

My googling returned to me nothing too.

So, maybe somebody here know: nowadays are two schools of the resembling Latin phonetics - one of them dicts us about 7-vowel system (S.Allen et al.), and another — that there was 5-vowel system (and 7-vowel diachronically), but both lack description of the qualities of the glides in the Latin diphthongs, or they described at random ways, chaotically: somewhere [ae̯], [au̯], somewhere [aɛ̯], [aʊ̯], etc., with nothing about codification through prescribed phonetic system.

At my point, it seems shall to be so:

  1. ae̯, au̯ in [ a(ː) ɛ(ː) ɔ(ː) i(ː) u(ː) / y(ː) ] - it would have looked better with [ai̯];

  2. ae̯, au̯ in [ a(ː) ɛ(ː) ɔ(ː) i(ː) u(ː) / ʏ yː ];

  3. aɪ̯, au̯ in [ a(ː) ɛ(ː) ɔ(ː) i(ː) u(ː) / ʏ yː ];

  4. aɛ̯, au̯ in [ a(ː) ɛ(ː) ɔ(ː) i(ː) u(ː) / y(ː) ];

  5. aɛ̯, au̯ in [ a(ː) ɛ(ː) ɔ(ː) i(ː) u(ː) / ʏ yː ];

  6. ae̯, au̯ in [ a(ː) ɛ eː ɔ oː ɪ iː ʊ u: / y(ː) / i, u pre-vocalic ];

  7. ae̯, aʊ̯ in [ a(ː) ɛ eː ɔ oː ɪ iː ʊ u: / ʏ yː / i, u pre-vocalic ];

  8. aɪ̯, au̯ in [ a(ː) ɛ eː ɔ oː ɪ iː ʊ u: / ʏ yː / i, u pre-vocalic ]

  9. aɪ̯, aʊ̯ in [ a(ː) ɛ eː ɔ oː ɪ iː ʊ u: / ʏ yː / i, u pre-vocalic ] - as more logical;

  10. aɛ̯, au̯ in [ a(ː) ɛ eː ɔ oː ɪ iː ʊ u: / ʏ yː / i, u pre-vocalic ];

  11. aɛ̯, aʊ̯ in [ a(ː) ɛ eː ɔ oː ɪ iː ʊ u: / ʏ yː / i, u pre-vocalic ] - narrow diphthongs seems to be more easily to transfer into [ɛ(ː), ɔ(ː)] respectively;

  12. Etc., if not present.

Notes: ae and au as examples, cause they are more common diphthongs in Latin than others; my question about diphthongs' qualities - open-to-close or open-to-near-close.

While I was writing, I realized why in most cases occurs [ae̯, au̯] - cause firstly it was [ai̯, au̯] and just ai̯ morphed into ae̯, but there are anyway many questions about phonetic system recombination, especially if it was morphed not into ae̯ but into aɛ̯.

Ass addition, some words about /a(ː)/ and what I meet in different sources:

  • it was [ ä(ː) ];
  • it was [ ɐ(ː) ];
  • it was [ ɑ̟(ː) ];
  • it was [ æ äː ];
  • it was [ ä æː ];
  • it was [ ä ɑː ];
  • it was [ ɑ äː ];
  • it was [ æ ɑː ];
  • it was [ ɑ æː ];
  • it was something about [ ä̟/ä/ä̠ ] in different environments;
  • it was etc., if not present.
  • FYI: Latin, like any other language, was never static, and changes affected its sound system too. What kind of Latin are you interested in? – Alex B. Jun 22 at 20:08
  • As in post teg, i.e. Classical Latin. – TrmIntrs2 Jun 22 at 20:14
  • Additionally, I have met another system: [ a(ː) e(ː) o(ː) i(ː) u(ː) ] in place of the [ a(ː) ɛ(ː) ɔ(ː) i(ː) u(ː) ]. So there are mentioned more such examples as in this topic. – TrmIntrs2 Jun 22 at 22:54

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.