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Q: How do you say "open your mind"in latin? (it's for a tattoo) was never resolved. A literal translation of "open your mind" would not work; therefore, some lateral thinking. From adjective, "mollis" = "susceptible"; verb, "mollio" = "soften; mitigate; make easier; tame; enfeeble" (Pock. Ox. Lat. Dict.) giving "molli animum fidei" = "make the spirit susceptible to faith".

Both TKR & cnread were unhappy with this use of "mollio" = "susceptible". Clutching at straws, I pointed out that the great Roman writers were adept at conferring meanings, upon words, not listed in dictionaries--an "evolutionary" process of massaging established definitions, sometimes to the point of incredulity. Lewis & Short was recommended (cnread). Among the applications: "Deus mollivit cor meum" = "God softened my heart". To soften the heart means to encourage someone to be amenable/ reasonable/ generous/ pleasant. This could be interpreted as "God made my heart susceptible to justice/ reason/ righteousness/ faith, could it not?

Is the application of "mollio" = "susceptible" acceptable; could "mollio" be a metaphor--softening is not literal; therefore "Deus mollivit cor meum." is, perhaps, an idiomatic expression?

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