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I’m founding an early music group dedicated to donating to climate change action, and I’d love to name the group, “Heal the World”, but in Latin, rather than English. I’d be very grateful for translation help, as my junior high Latin courses were many moons ago. I want the order to be addressed to many, not a person at a time.

Rather than Sanate Mundum, what about Recurare Mundum? Medeor Mundum? Salvificem Mundum? The latter meaning, “save the world”, I presume?

Are these conjugated correctly and is the vocabulary appropriate? I’m hesitant to use “sanate” just because it’s a cognate to “sanitize” in English, which sounds a bit unpleasant for the name of an ensemble. Thanks!

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  • Welcome to the site! The name "Heal the World" appears to be an order. Is it given to one person ("you individual, heal the world") or several ("all of you together, heal the world")? It makes a difference in Latin. Please edit your question to add details. – Joonas Ilmavirta Jul 27 '19 at 9:28
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    Thanks! Several people -- all of you together, heal the world. – virtuosovoce Jul 27 '19 at 19:51
  • I edited that into your question and wrote up an answer. Please take a look at our introductory tour to see the basic functions of the site. And of course, feel free to edit your question further if you want. – Joonas Ilmavirta Jul 27 '19 at 20:06
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I suggest using the word mundus for "world" and sanare for "heal". There are also other options like orbis and curare. You can check and compare the words — and find new ones — in any of the many online Latin dictionaries. (The verbs are often listed as sano and curo instead of sanare and curare.)

With these words, the order would be Mundum sanate, "heal the world". Either word order is fine, so Sanate mundum works as well if it sounds better to you.

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  • thanks! What about Solvitur Mundum? Medeor Mundum? Salvificem Mundum? (Save the world, I presume). Are these conjugated correctly and is the vocabulary appropriate? I’m hesitant to use “sanate” just because it’s a cognate to “sanitize” in English, which sounds a bit unpleasant for the name of an early music ensemble. Thanks! – virtuosovoce Aug 9 '19 at 17:24

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