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What is the closest meaning of this statement?

Single comma there is intentional, it's not an enumeration. I understand that liberty cures, but struggling to connect the two words in first part.

  • Are you sure the first word is amore and not amorem? – Draconis May 12 '19 at 23:31
  • Yes, what's the difference? – Max Tsepkov May 13 '19 at 7:08
  • Is amorem correct spelling or it has different meaning? – Max Tsepkov May 13 '19 at 7:17
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    Source/context would be helpful . – fdb May 13 '19 at 9:51
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    Like Fdb, I must insist on more context. Because, without context, this phrase seems bad Latin, and people are doing their utmost to make something out of it; with context, it would probably be easier to tell whether it was just bad Latin or something that made sense. And we mean context in the broadest sense: anything you know could help. Did you make up this phrase yourself? Is it from Google Translate? From a poem? An fragment from an inscription? Would it make sense for us to reconstruct omitted words or not? – Cerberus May 13 '19 at 16:21
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honoro means 'cherish,' 'show respect' " to clothe or adorn with honor; to honor, respect; to adorn, ornament, embellish, decorate." (Tufts Lewis and Short)
The Accusative Libertatem, Liberty, shows what is honoured, respected With the Ablative it shows how respect is shown (with a ceremony: Suetonius or with a gift, or a position/ or status Vet. Patr. see esp. "to honour virtue" Cicero Philippics 9/2/4)

Cura is the tricky word.
If it is from the verb curo 'care for,' 'look after,' these are two imperatives, two maxims to be followed. These are the two obligations, the personal and the civic.

amore honora, libertatem cura,
Show respect by means of love, take good care of freedom.

II But if it is the noun: cura, "trouble, care, attention, pains, industry, diligence, exertion." wh., is statistically more likely (see perseus tufts Lewis & Short) Then amore, cura, (asyndeton) together mean "with love, with diligence."

amore honora, libertatem cura,
With love, with care show your respect for freedom.

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A way to make sense of the phrase as a whole is if the context is religious. This could be a piece of an explanation of the Fourth Commandment:

honora patrem tuum et matrem/Honour thy father and thy mother (Ex 20:12, Eph 6:2)

It would make a lot of sense if it is trying to explain that one has to honor one's parents with love, aiming to grow up to be free, autonomous adults. This, while continuing to love them.

My translation in that case would be:

Honor [them/your parents] with love, [but] pursue [your] freedom.

Even if it is not an explanation of the fourth commandment, it makes the most sense to me if translated this way.


Regarding liberty cures, I'm afraid it is not quite a suitable translation, since I think the verb curo would need to be in 3rd person: (e.g., curat, or something else ending in -t).

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The first part could be an abl. absol. giving--"with love having been honest" in the sense of "free from deceit". The second part (agree with Hugh) seems only tenuously linked to the first, requiring a colon; not, a comma.

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    That is creative! So you would have to assume an adjective honorus, which does indeed exist. The only problem is that amor is masculine, so it would have to be honoro then. – Cerberus May 13 '19 at 16:18
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    @Cerberus What if you referred to a woman as "my love"? I guess it'd make sense to treat amor as feminine then. But that'd take the whole translation in a new direction, too... – Joonas Ilmavirta May 13 '19 at 18:25
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    @JoonasIlmavirta♦: I'm afraid it would still have to be masculine, then, as it would only refer to a female person metaphorically. – Cerberus May 13 '19 at 18:30
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    @Cerberus: Thanks: tend to think of "love" as feminine: back to the drawing board. – tony May 13 '19 at 18:38
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    @Joonasllmavirta: thanks for (almost) saving me; but, there's no fooling Cerberus. – tony May 13 '19 at 18:40

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