1

In an article from G. Peano,

§1. Casus

§2. Genere masculino, feminino et neutro

§3. Numero singulare et plurale

I wonder if casus should be understood as singular or as plural. As far as I know it belongs to the 4th declension, I guess the case is nominative so I have no way to distinguish between "The case" and "The cases". Maybe the other titles will help.

4
  • As you say casus could be either singular or plural. Genere, 'gender,' and Numero 'number,' although Singular are not in the Nominative. I personally don't think your question can be answered.
    – Hugh
    May 12 '19 at 14:39
  • Thank you but I don't get "although Singular are not in the Nominative".
    – user3165
    May 12 '19 at 14:45
  • 1
    In a list of titles you might expect all to be Nominative singular: Casus, Genus, Numerus. Or else all nom plural Casus, Genera, Numeri. Or else all Ablative singular: Casu, Numero, Genere. No consistency. So it is up to you.
    – Hugh
    May 12 '19 at 15:00
  • Please make it an answer so that I close the question. Thank you :)
    – user3165
    May 12 '19 at 16:47
0

I assume the (unidentified) article by Peano is in Italian. In no. 2 and 3 the title is a mixture of Latin and Italian. Actually only "et" is Latin.

Edit: The correct answer is in my comment below.

3
  • sites.google.com/site/latinosineflexio/…
    – user3165
    May 12 '19 at 20:55
  • @Blincer. Thank you for the link. This is not Latin, nor is it Italian. It is "Latino sine flexione", an artificial language invented by Peano.
    – fdb
    May 12 '19 at 21:38
  • Yes I knew it was the topic but I did not notice he uses the lang in the article.
    – user3165
    May 12 '19 at 21:39
1

As you say casŭs, casūs could be either singular or plural Nominative.

Genere, 'gender,' and Numero 'number,' although both Singular are not in the Nominative. I personally don't think your question can be answered.

In a list of titles you might expect all to be Nominative singular:

Casus, Genus, Numerus.

Or else all nom plural

Casūs, Genera, Numeri.

Or else all Ablative singular:

Casu, Numero, Genere.

There is no consistency. So it is up to you.

However, in this paper, when 'casus,' even without a macron, occurs in the next two sentences, it is definitely plural. In context 'casus' sounds better translated as plural or implying Case in general.

0

For the sake of having it in an answer:

This article seems to be De Latino sine Flexione, where Peano proposes using Latin as the international language, but without any inflections. Nouns, for example, generally go in the ablative singular (which looks the closest to the Romance forms).

The article starts out in proper Classical Latin, so casūs is plural: "The Cases". But as it goes on, it drops more and more of the inflections: genere is also plural ("The Genders"), but it's been given an ablative singular ending.

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