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  • The concept of 'deponency'"deponency" and the term 'deponent'"deponent" are not useful for explaining Latin verbs that exist without active morphologies; they are better referred to as middle-only or media tantum verbs.
  • The Latin media tantum verbs are largely derived from historically middle Proto-Indo-European verbs; semi-deponent verbs, suppletive in the passive, represent the main exception.
  • There do exist "deponent coinages" -- verbs which can truly be considered deponent -- which exist outside the class of media tantum.
  • The media tantum verbs can be divided into seven broad semantic categories, which themselves clarify why the classification of middle makes the most logical sense.
  • The concept of 'deponency' and the term 'deponent' are not useful for explaining Latin verbs that exist without active morphologies; they are better referred to as middle-only or media tantum verbs.
  • The Latin media tantum verbs are largely derived from historically middle Proto-Indo-European verbs; semi-deponent verbs, suppletive in the passive, represent the main exception.
  • There do exist "deponent coinages" -- verbs which can truly be considered deponent -- which exist outside the class of media tantum.
  • The media tantum verbs can be divided into seven broad semantic categories, which themselves clarify why the classification of middle makes the most logical sense.
  • The concept of "deponency" and the term "deponent" are not useful for explaining Latin verbs that exist without active morphologies; they are better referred to as middle-only or media tantum verbs.
  • The Latin media tantum verbs are largely derived from historically middle Proto-Indo-European verbs; semi-deponent verbs, suppletive in the passive, represent the main exception.
  • There do exist "deponent coinages" -- verbs which can truly be considered deponent -- which exist outside the class of media tantum.
  • The media tantum verbs can be divided into seven broad semantic categories, which themselves clarify why the classification of middle makes the most logical sense.
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The oft-quoted dictum "passive in form, active in meaning" is utterly nonsensical from a linguistic standpoint (and many would argue too, from a pedagogical standpoint) for describing mostmost so-called "deponent" verbs (there do exist exceptions; these will be outlined later). The saying "middle in form, middle in meaning" captures the truth with the same succinctness; these are not "deponent" verbs: they are media tantum (middle-only) verbs.

It is also worth noting that Late Latin saw a subsequent rise in 'deponent coinages'"deponent coinages" (technically true deponents),-- which can technically be considered "true deponents" -- followed by an equally quick regularization of these true deponents and media tantum verbs totowards active morphologies.

  • The concept of 'deponency' and the term 'deponent' are not useful for explaining Latin verbs that exist without active morphologies; they are better referred to as middle-only or media tantum verbs.
  • The Latin media tantum verbs are largely derived from historically middle Proto-Indo-European verbs; semi-deponent verbs, suppletive in the passive, represent the main exception.
  • TheseThere do exist "deponent coinages" -- verbs which can truly be considered deponent -- which exist outside the class of media tantum.
  • The media tantum verbs can be divided into seven broad semantic categories, which themselves expand uponclarify why the classification of middle makes the most logical sense.

The oft-quoted dictum "passive in form, active in meaning" is utterly nonsensical from a linguistic standpoint (and many would argue too, from a pedagogical standpoint) for describing most so-called "deponent" verbs. The saying "middle in form, middle in meaning" captures the truth with the same succinctness; these are not "deponent" verbs: they are media tantum (middle-only) verbs.

It is also worth noting that Late Latin saw a subsequent rise in 'deponent coinages' (technically true deponents), followed by an equally quick regularization of these true deponents and media tantum verbs to active morphologies.

  • The concept of 'deponency' and the term 'deponent' are not useful for explaining Latin verbs that exist without active morphologies; they are better referred to as middle-only or media tantum verbs.
  • The Latin media tantum verbs are largely derived from historically middle Proto-Indo-European verbs; semi-deponent verbs, suppletive in the passive, represent the main exception.
  • These media tantum verbs can be divided into seven broad semantic categories, which themselves expand upon why the classification of middle makes the most logical sense.

The oft-quoted dictum "passive in form, active in meaning" is utterly nonsensical from a linguistic standpoint (and many would argue too, from a pedagogical standpoint) for describing most so-called "deponent" verbs (there do exist exceptions; these will be outlined later). The saying "middle in form, middle in meaning" captures the truth with the same succinctness; these are not "deponent" verbs: they are media tantum (middle-only) verbs.

It is also worth noting that Late Latin saw a subsequent rise in "deponent coinages" -- which can technically be considered "true deponents" -- followed by an equally quick regularization of these true deponents and media tantum verbs towards active morphologies.

  • The concept of 'deponency' and the term 'deponent' are not useful for explaining Latin verbs that exist without active morphologies; they are better referred to as middle-only or media tantum verbs.
  • The Latin media tantum verbs are largely derived from historically middle Proto-Indo-European verbs; semi-deponent verbs, suppletive in the passive, represent the main exception.
  • There do exist "deponent coinages" -- verbs which can truly be considered deponent -- which exist outside the class of media tantum.
  • The media tantum verbs can be divided into seven broad semantic categories, which themselves clarify why the classification of middle makes the most logical sense.
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The oft-quoted dictum "passive in form, active in meaning" is utterly nonsensical from a linguistic standpoint (and many would argue too, from a pedagogical standpoint) for describing most so-called "deponent" verbs. The saying "middle in form, middle in meaning" captures the truth with the same succinctness; these are not "deponent" verbs: they are media tantum (middle-only) verbs.

The evolution of these media tantum verbs may at first seem perplexing: Latin has an active-passive opposition in voice; there exists no middle. However, it largely appears to be the case that these media tantum verbs arose from Proto-Indo-European middle verbs. There do exist some verbs whose origins remain murky, though. The so-called 'semi-deponents', suppletive in the perfect, are one such good example.

It is also worth noting that Late Latin saw a subsequent rise in 'deponent coinages' (technically true deponents), followed by an equally quick regularization of these true deponents and media tantum verbs to active morphologies.

The oft-quoted dictum "passive in form, active in meaning" is utterly nonsensical from a linguistic standpoint (and many would argue too, from a pedagogical standpoint) for describing so-called "deponent" verbs. The saying "middle in form, middle in meaning" captures the truth with the same succinctness; these are not "deponent" verbs: they are media tantum (middle-only) verbs.

The evolution of these media tantum verbs may at first seem perplexing: Latin has an active-passive opposition in voice; there exists no middle. However, it largely appears to be the case that these media tantum verbs arose from Proto-Indo-European middle verbs. There do exist some verbs whose origins remain murky, though. The so-called 'semi-deponents', suppletive in the perfect, are one such good example.

The oft-quoted dictum "passive in form, active in meaning" is utterly nonsensical from a linguistic standpoint (and many would argue too, from a pedagogical standpoint) for describing most so-called "deponent" verbs. The saying "middle in form, middle in meaning" captures the truth with the same succinctness; these are not "deponent" verbs: they are media tantum (middle-only) verbs.

The evolution of these media tantum verbs may at first seem perplexing: Latin has an active-passive opposition in voice; there exists no middle. However, it largely appears to be the case that these media tantum verbs arose from Proto-Indo-European middle verbs. There do exist some verbs whose origins remain murky, though. The so-called 'semi-deponents', suppletive in the perfect, are one such good example.

It is also worth noting that Late Latin saw a subsequent rise in 'deponent coinages' (technically true deponents), followed by an equally quick regularization of these true deponents and media tantum verbs to active morphologies.

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