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It is most probably either a regular comparative or one built by analogy to other regular comparatives.

Not sure if it is possible to prove or disprove the existence of and adj. *anterus to which anterior would be the comparative, in the same way that posterior is of posterus. Disclaimer: this is out of my comfort zone, and has to be taken as a not-very-informed hypothesis.

Posterus is the adj., postea the adverb. *Anterus would be the adj. corresponding to adv. anteaantea.

About the existence of *anterus and the hypothesis that anterior is its regular comparative, I found two pieces of evidence: a XIX century lexicon by a Latin Professor at Oxford and a XV century book actually written in Latin by a prominent Flemish humanist (according to wp).

Now, L&S says anterior is late Latin and cites Sulpicius Severus using the word as early as the V century. Whether *anterus existed or not (at least in spoken) at that time, I haven't been able to foundfind any evidence. The fact that it doesn't show up in good dictionaries or corpora is a good argument against its popularity. But even if it did not exist, the -r- could have been derived (as an innovation) by analogy with postea > posterus > posterior

As noted by Colin and Hugh, the same analogy works with other adverb/adjective pairs:

  • infra/inferus/inferior
  • intus,inter/internus(?)/interior
  • extra/exterus/exterior

It is most probably either a regular comparative or one built by analogy to other regular comparatives.

Not sure if it is possible to prove or disprove the existence of and adj. *anterus to which anterior would be the comparative, in the same way that posterior is of posterus. Disclaimer: this is out of my comfort zone, and has to be taken as a not-very-informed hypothesis.

Posterus is the adj., postea the adverb. *Anterus would be the adj. corresponding to adv. antea.

About the existence of *anterus and the hypothesis that anterior is its regular comparative, I found two pieces of evidence: a XIX century lexicon by a Latin Professor at Oxford and a XV century book actually written in Latin by a prominent Flemish humanist (according to wp).

Now, L&S says anterior is late Latin and cites Sulpicius Severus using the word as early as the V century. Whether *anterus existed or not (at least in spoken) at that time, I haven't been able to found any evidence. The fact that it doesn't show up in good dictionaries or corpora is a good argument against its popularity. But even if it did not exist, the -r- could have been derived (as an innovation) by analogy with postea > posterus > posterior

As noted by Colin and Hugh, the same analogy works with other adverb/adjective pairs:

  • infra/inferus/inferior
  • intus,inter//interior
  • extra/exterus/exterior

It is most probably either a regular comparative or one built by analogy to other regular comparatives.

Not sure if it is possible to prove or disprove the existence of and adj. *anterus to which anterior would be the comparative, in the same way that posterior is of posterus.

Posterus is the adj., postea the adverb. *Anterus would be the adj. corresponding to adv. antea.

About the existence of *anterus and the hypothesis that anterior is its regular comparative, I found two pieces of evidence: a XIX century lexicon by a Latin Professor at Oxford and a XV century book actually written in Latin by a prominent Flemish humanist (according to wp).

Now, L&S says anterior is late Latin and cites Sulpicius Severus using the word as early as the V century. Whether *anterus existed or not (at least in spoken) at that time, I haven't been able to find any evidence. The fact that it doesn't show up in good dictionaries or corpora is a good argument against its popularity. But even if it did not exist, the -r- could have been derived (as an innovation) by analogy with postea > posterus > posterior

As noted by Colin and Hugh, the same analogy works with other adverb/adjective pairs:

  • infra/inferus/inferior
  • intus/internus(?)/interior
  • extra/exterus/exterior
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It is most probably either a regular comparative or one built by analogy to other regular comparativesbuilt by analogy to other regular comparatives.

Not sure if it is possible to prove or disprove the existence of and adj. *anterus to which anterior would be the comparative, in the same way that posterior is of posterus. Disclaimer: this is out of my comfort zone, and has to be taken as a not-very-informed hypothesis.

Posterus is the adj., postea the adverb. *Anterus would be the adj. corresponding to adv. antea.

About the existence of *anterus and the hypothesis that anterior is its regular comparative, I found two pieces of evidence: a XIX century lexicon by a Latin Professor at Oxford and a XV century book actually written in Latin by a prominent Flemish humanist (according to wp).

Now, L&S says anterior is late Latin and cites Sulpicius Severus using the word as early as the V century. Whether *anterus existed or not (at least in spoken) at that time, I haven't been able to found any evidence. The fact that it doesn't show up easily in good dictionaries or corpora is a good argument against its widespreadpopularity. But even if it did not exist, the -r- could have been derived (as an innovation) by analogy with postea > posterus > posterior

As noted by Colin and Hugh, the same analogy works with other adverb/adjective pairs:

  • infra/inferus/inferior
  • intus,inter//interior
  • extra/exterus/exterior

It is most probably either a regular comparative or one built by analogy to other regular comparatives.

Not sure if it is possible to prove or disprove the existence of and adj. *anterus to which anterior would be the comparative, in the same way that posterior is of posterus. Disclaimer: this is out of my comfort zone, and has to be taken as a not-very-informed hypothesis.

Posterus is the adj., postea the adverb. *Anterus would be the adj. corresponding to adv. antea.

About the existence of *anterus and the hypothesis that anterior is its regular comparative, I found two pieces of evidence: a XIX century lexicon by a Latin Professor at Oxford and a XV century book actually written in Latin by a prominent Flemish humanist (according to wp).

Now, L&S says anterior is late Latin and cites Sulpicius Severus using the word as early as the V century. Whether *anterus existed or not (at least in spoken) at that time, I haven't been able to found any evidence. The fact that it doesn't show up easily in good dictionaries or corpora is a good argument against its widespread. But even if it did not exist, the -r- could have been derived (as an innovation) by analogy with postea > posterus > posterior

As noted by Colin and Hugh, the same analogy works with other adverb/adjective pairs:

  • infra/inferus/inferior
  • intus,inter//interior
  • extra/exterus/exterior

It is most probably either a regular comparative or one built by analogy to other regular comparatives.

Not sure if it is possible to prove or disprove the existence of and adj. *anterus to which anterior would be the comparative, in the same way that posterior is of posterus. Disclaimer: this is out of my comfort zone, and has to be taken as a not-very-informed hypothesis.

Posterus is the adj., postea the adverb. *Anterus would be the adj. corresponding to adv. antea.

About the existence of *anterus and the hypothesis that anterior is its regular comparative, I found two pieces of evidence: a XIX century lexicon by a Latin Professor at Oxford and a XV century book actually written in Latin by a prominent Flemish humanist (according to wp).

Now, L&S says anterior is late Latin and cites Sulpicius Severus using the word as early as the V century. Whether *anterus existed or not (at least in spoken) at that time, I haven't been able to found any evidence. The fact that it doesn't show up in good dictionaries or corpora is a good argument against its popularity. But even if it did not exist, the -r- could have been derived (as an innovation) by analogy with postea > posterus > posterior

As noted by Colin and Hugh, the same analogy works with other adverb/adjective pairs:

  • infra/inferus/inferior
  • intus,inter//interior
  • extra/exterus/exterior
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One hypothesis—notIt is most probably either a regular comparative or one built by analogy to other regular comparatives.

Not sure if it is possible to prove—, is that anterior is in factprove or disprove the comparativeexistence of and adj. *anterus to which anterior would be the comparative, in the same way that posterior is of posterus. Disclaimer: this is out of my comfort zone, and has to be taken as a not-very-informed hypothesis.

Posterus is the adj., postea the adverb. *Anterus would be the adj. corresponding to adv. antea.

About the existence of *anterus and the hypothesis that anterior is its regular comparative, I found two pieces of evidence: a XIX century lexicon by a Latin Professor at Oxford and a XV century book actually written in Latin by a prominent Flemish humanist (according to wp).

Now, L&S says anterior is late Latin and cites Sulpicius Severus using the word as early as the V century. Whether *anterus existed or not (at least in spoken) at that time, I haven't been able to found any evidence. The fact that it doesn't show up easily in good dictionaries or corpora is a good argument against its widespread. But even if it did not exist, the -r- could have been derived (as an innovation) by analogy with postea > posterus > posterior

As noted by Colin and Hugh, the same analogy works with other adverb/adjective pairs:

  • infra/inferus/inferior
  • intus,inter//interior
  • extra/exterus/exterior

One hypothesis—not sure if possible to prove—, is that anterior is in fact the comparative of *anterus in the same way that posterior is of posterus. Disclaimer: this is out of my comfort zone, and has to be taken as a not-very-informed hypothesis.

Posterus is the adj., postea the adverb. *Anterus would be the adj. corresponding to adv. antea.

About the existence of *anterus and the hypothesis that anterior is its regular comparative, I found two pieces of evidence: a XIX century lexicon by a Latin Professor at Oxford and a XV century book actually written in Latin by a prominent Flemish humanist (according to wp).

Now, L&S says anterior is late Latin and cites Sulpicius Severus using the word as early as the V century. Whether *anterus existed (at least in spoken) at that time, I haven't been able to found any evidence. But even if it did not, the -r- could have been derived (as an innovation) by analogy with postea > posterus > posterior

It is most probably either a regular comparative or one built by analogy to other regular comparatives.

Not sure if it is possible to prove or disprove the existence of and adj. *anterus to which anterior would be the comparative, in the same way that posterior is of posterus. Disclaimer: this is out of my comfort zone, and has to be taken as a not-very-informed hypothesis.

Posterus is the adj., postea the adverb. *Anterus would be the adj. corresponding to adv. antea.

About the existence of *anterus and the hypothesis that anterior is its regular comparative, I found two pieces of evidence: a XIX century lexicon by a Latin Professor at Oxford and a XV century book actually written in Latin by a prominent Flemish humanist (according to wp).

Now, L&S says anterior is late Latin and cites Sulpicius Severus using the word as early as the V century. Whether *anterus existed or not (at least in spoken) at that time, I haven't been able to found any evidence. The fact that it doesn't show up easily in good dictionaries or corpora is a good argument against its widespread. But even if it did not exist, the -r- could have been derived (as an innovation) by analogy with postea > posterus > posterior

As noted by Colin and Hugh, the same analogy works with other adverb/adjective pairs:

  • infra/inferus/inferior
  • intus,inter//interior
  • extra/exterus/exterior
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