4 added 23 characters in body
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That full stop after cecidit is misleading and possibly an error;After the latest change, the question has become less urgent, but I'll leave this answer up anyway.

This is just ordinary ut + perfect "when", introducing a subordinate clause. ManySome editions have a semicolon, which makes it work:

...quibus tumultuariis certaminibus haud ferme plures Saguntini cadebant quam Poeni. Ut uero Hannibal ipse, dum murum incautius subit, aduersum femur tragula grauiter ictus cecidit; tanta circa fuga ac trepidatio fuit ut non multum abesset quin opera ac uineae desererentur.

Hannibal is besieging Saguntum: "...and in those tumultuous battles about as many Saguntines fell as Phoenicians. But, when Hannibal himself, as he went recklessly up (to) the wall, was hit gravely in the thigh by a tragula and fell; there was such flight and terror all around that the siege works and mantlets were almost left behind."

A semicolon can be used to mark a subordinate clause in a long sentence, especially in older print. And the Romans didn't use punctuation as we do at any rate, so we should not pay it too much heed. The Hewlett-Packard edition uses a comma there, for exampleas does your excerpt.

That full stop after cecidit is misleading and possibly an error; this is just ordinary ut + perfect "when", introducing a subordinate clause. Many editions have a semicolon, which makes it work:

...quibus tumultuariis certaminibus haud ferme plures Saguntini cadebant quam Poeni. Ut uero Hannibal ipse, dum murum incautius subit, aduersum femur tragula grauiter ictus cecidit; tanta circa fuga ac trepidatio fuit ut non multum abesset quin opera ac uineae desererentur.

Hannibal is besieging Saguntum: "...and in those tumultuous battles about as many Saguntines fell as Phoenicians. But, when Hannibal himself, as he went recklessly up (to) the wall, was hit gravely in the thigh by a tragula and fell; there was such flight and terror all around that the siege works and mantlets were almost left behind."

A semicolon can be used to mark a subordinate clause in a long sentence, especially in older print. And the Romans didn't use punctuation as we do at any rate, so we should not pay it too much heed. The Hewlett-Packard edition uses a comma there, for example.

After the latest change, the question has become less urgent, but I'll leave this answer up anyway.

This is just ordinary ut + perfect "when", introducing a subordinate clause. Some editions have a semicolon:

...quibus tumultuariis certaminibus haud ferme plures Saguntini cadebant quam Poeni. Ut uero Hannibal ipse, dum murum incautius subit, aduersum femur tragula grauiter ictus cecidit; tanta circa fuga ac trepidatio fuit ut non multum abesset quin opera ac uineae desererentur.

Hannibal is besieging Saguntum: "...and in those tumultuous battles about as many Saguntines fell as Phoenicians. But, when Hannibal himself, as he went recklessly up (to) the wall, was hit gravely in the thigh by a tragula and fell; there was such flight and terror all around that the siege works and mantlets were almost left behind."

A semicolon can be used to mark a subordinate clause in a long sentence, especially in older print. And the Romans didn't use punctuation as we do at any rate, so we should not pay it too much heed. The Hewlett-Packard edition uses a comma there, as does your excerpt.

3 edited body
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That full stop after cecidit is misleading and possibly an error; this is just ordinary ut + perfect "when", introducing a subordinate clause. Many editions have a semicolon, which makes it work:

...quibus tumultuariis certaminibus haud ferme plures Saguntini cadebant quam Poeni. Ut uero Hannibal ipse, dum murum incautius subit, aduersum femur tragula grauiter ictus cecidit; tanta circa fuga ac trepidatio fuit ut non multum abesset quin opera ac uineae desererentur.

Hannibal is besieging Saguntum: "...and in those tumultuous battles hardly moreabout as many Saguntines fell thanas Phoenicians. But, when Hannibal himself, whileas he went recklessly going up (to) the wall, was hit gravely in the thigh by a tragula and fell; there was such flight and terror all around that the siege works and mantlets were almost left behind."

A semicolon can be used to mark a subordinate clause in a long sentence, especially in older print. And the Romans didn't use punctuation as we do at any rate, so we should not pay it too much heed. The Hewlett-Packard edition uses a comma there, for example.

That full stop after cecidit is misleading and possibly an error; this is just ordinary ut + perfect "when", introducing a subordinate clause. Many editions have a semicolon, which makes it work:

...quibus tumultuariis certaminibus haud ferme plures Saguntini cadebant quam Poeni. Ut uero Hannibal ipse, dum murum incautius subit, aduersum femur tragula grauiter ictus cecidit; tanta circa fuga ac trepidatio fuit ut non multum abesset quin opera ac uineae desererentur.

"...and in those tumultuous battles hardly more Saguntines fell than Phoenicians. But, when Hannibal himself, while recklessly going up the wall, was hit gravely in the thigh by a tragula and fell; there was such flight and terror all around that the siege works and mantlets were almost left behind."

A semicolon can be used to mark a subordinate clause in a long sentence, especially in older print. And the Romans didn't use punctuation as we do at any rate, so we should not pay it too much heed. The Hewlett-Packard edition uses a comma there, for example.

That full stop after cecidit is misleading and possibly an error; this is just ordinary ut + perfect "when", introducing a subordinate clause. Many editions have a semicolon, which makes it work:

...quibus tumultuariis certaminibus haud ferme plures Saguntini cadebant quam Poeni. Ut uero Hannibal ipse, dum murum incautius subit, aduersum femur tragula grauiter ictus cecidit; tanta circa fuga ac trepidatio fuit ut non multum abesset quin opera ac uineae desererentur.

Hannibal is besieging Saguntum: "...and in those tumultuous battles about as many Saguntines fell as Phoenicians. But, when Hannibal himself, as he went recklessly up (to) the wall, was hit gravely in the thigh by a tragula and fell; there was such flight and terror all around that the siege works and mantlets were almost left behind."

A semicolon can be used to mark a subordinate clause in a long sentence, especially in older print. And the Romans didn't use punctuation as we do at any rate, so we should not pay it too much heed. The Hewlett-Packard edition uses a comma there, for example.

2 added 58 characters in body
source | link

That full stop after cecidit is misleading and possibly an error; this is just ordinary ut + perfect "when", introducing a subordinate clause. Many editions have a semicolon, which makes it work:

...quibus tumultuariis certaminibus haud ferme plures Saguntini cadebant quam Poeni. Ut uero Hannibal ipse, dum murum incautius subit, aduersum femur tragula grauiter ictus cecidit; tanta circa fuga ac trepidatio fuit ut non multum abesset quin opera ac uineae desererentur.

"But"...and in those tumultuous battles hardly more Saguntines fell than Phoenicians. But, when Hannibal himself, while recklessly going up the wall, was hit gravely in the thigh by a tragula and fell; there was such flight and terror all around that.. the siege works and mantlets were almost left behind."

A semicolon can be used to mark a subordinate clause in a long sentence, especially in older print. And the Romans didn't use punctuation as we do at any rate, so we should not pay it too much heed. The Hewlett-Packard edition uses a comma there, for example.

That full stop after cecidit is misleading and possibly an error; this is just ordinary ut + perfect "when", introducing a subordinate clause. Many editions have a semicolon, which makes it work:

...quibus tumultuariis certaminibus haud ferme plures Saguntini cadebant quam Poeni. Ut uero Hannibal ipse, dum murum incautius subit, aduersum femur tragula grauiter ictus cecidit; tanta circa fuga ac trepidatio fuit ut non multum abesset quin opera ac uineae desererentur.

"But, when Hannibal himself, while recklessly going up the wall, was hit gravely in the thigh by a tragula and fell; there was such flight and terror all around that..."

A semicolon can be used to mark a subordinate clause in a long sentence, especially in older print. And the Romans didn't use punctuation as we do at any rate, so we should not pay it too much heed. The Hewlett-Packard edition uses a comma there, for example.

That full stop after cecidit is misleading and possibly an error; this is just ordinary ut + perfect "when", introducing a subordinate clause. Many editions have a semicolon, which makes it work:

...quibus tumultuariis certaminibus haud ferme plures Saguntini cadebant quam Poeni. Ut uero Hannibal ipse, dum murum incautius subit, aduersum femur tragula grauiter ictus cecidit; tanta circa fuga ac trepidatio fuit ut non multum abesset quin opera ac uineae desererentur.

"...and in those tumultuous battles hardly more Saguntines fell than Phoenicians. But, when Hannibal himself, while recklessly going up the wall, was hit gravely in the thigh by a tragula and fell; there was such flight and terror all around that the siege works and mantlets were almost left behind."

A semicolon can be used to mark a subordinate clause in a long sentence, especially in older print. And the Romans didn't use punctuation as we do at any rate, so we should not pay it too much heed. The Hewlett-Packard edition uses a comma there, for example.

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