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The Pock. Ox. Lat. Dict. gives alternative form, "nosco", only; which may answer the Q for yourself. Placing a "g" in front of a consonant creates a jerky, clumsy pronunciation; the kind of thing which softens with time; perhaps pronounced "gernosco"; eventually falling out of use, altogether--"nosco".

As a boy, reading about WWII, thought that the name of the German battleship "Gneisanau" was pronounced "neisanau"; but it wasn't & isn't.

Then, in Turkish, there is "yamusak" (soft) "g" (pronounced "yamuSHak")--with a circumflex. It always comes after a vowel and turns that vowel into a long sound; but, is itself not pronounced. Therefore, by definition, no words can begin with this letter. The President, Erdogan; it's pronounced, "erdo An"; not, "erdo Gan"--BBC journalists seem to have, finally, got the message.

Is this relevant? Probably not; but, the old letter "g" gets itself around, working its magic. How things were pronounced, millenia ago, is a tall order to answer: customs, mores, evolution, convenience: we humans are bedevilled by our own inclination to laziness--if it's easy/ comfortable to soften/ drop a jerky pronunciation, that's exactly what will happen.

Having thought that this Q was difficult to answer, it seems that a solution may be found in the work of Andras Cser (Thanks to sumelic.) (Q: "Does an ig- prefix mean there's an underlying g in the root?"). He opined that, in the history of Latin, there was a "floating C-Place node" in pronunciation. This fell out of use before the days of "Classical Latin"; but, affected words beginning -"ig".

Therefore, it might account for "gnosco" falling out of use/ evolving into "nosco"?

The Pock. Ox. Lat. Dict. gives alternative form, "nosco", only; which may answer the Q for yourself. Placing a "g" in front of a consonant creates a jerky, clumsy pronunciation; the kind of thing which softens with time; perhaps pronounced "gernosco"; eventually falling out of use, altogether--"nosco".

As a boy, reading about WWII, thought that the name of the German battleship "Gneisanau" was pronounced "neisanau"; but it wasn't & isn't.

Then, in Turkish, there is "yamusak" (soft) "g" (pronounced "yamuSHak")--with a circumflex. It always comes after a vowel and turns that vowel into a long sound; but, is itself not pronounced. Therefore, by definition, no words can begin with this letter. The President, Erdogan; it's pronounced, "erdo An"; not, "erdo Gan"--BBC journalists seem to have, finally, got the message.

Is this relevant? Probably not; but, the old letter "g" gets itself around, working its magic. How things were pronounced, millenia ago, is a tall order to answer: customs, mores, evolution, convenience: we humans are bedevilled by our own inclination to laziness--if it's easy/ comfortable to soften/ drop a jerky pronunciation, that's exactly what will happen.....

The Pock. Ox. Lat. Dict. gives alternative form, "nosco", only; which may answer the Q for yourself. Placing a "g" in front of a consonant creates a jerky, clumsy pronunciation; the kind of thing which softens with time; perhaps pronounced "gernosco"; eventually falling out of use, altogether--"nosco".

As a boy, reading about WWII, thought that the name of the German battleship "Gneisanau" was pronounced "neisanau"; but it wasn't & isn't.

Then, in Turkish, there is "yamusak" (soft) "g" (pronounced "yamuSHak")--with a circumflex. It always comes after a vowel and turns that vowel into a long sound; but, is itself not pronounced. Therefore, by definition, no words can begin with this letter. The President, Erdogan; it's pronounced, "erdo An"; not, "erdo Gan"--BBC journalists seem to have, finally, got the message.

Is this relevant? Probably not; but, the old letter "g" gets itself around, working its magic. How things were pronounced, millenia ago, is a tall order to answer: customs, mores, evolution, convenience: we humans are bedevilled by our own inclination to laziness--if it's easy/ comfortable to soften/ drop a jerky pronunciation, that's exactly what will happen.

Having thought that this Q was difficult to answer, it seems that a solution may be found in the work of Andras Cser (Thanks to sumelic.) (Q: "Does an ig- prefix mean there's an underlying g in the root?"). He opined that, in the history of Latin, there was a "floating C-Place node" in pronunciation. This fell out of use before the days of "Classical Latin"; but, affected words beginning -"ig".

Therefore, it might account for "gnosco" falling out of use/ evolving into "nosco"?

4 added 4 characters in body
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The Pock. Ox. Lat. Dict. gives alternative form, "nosco", only; which may answer the Q for yourself. Placing a "g" in front of a consonant creates a jerky, clumsy pronunciation; the kind of thing which softens with time; perhaps pronounced "gernosco"; eventually falling out of use, altogether--"nosco".

As a boy, reading about WWII, thought that the name of the German battleship "Gneisanau" was pronounced "neisanau"; but it wasn't & isn't.

Then, in Turkish, there is "yamusak" (soft) "g" (pronounced "yamuSHak")--with a circumflex. It always comes after a vowel and turns that vowel into a long sound; but, is itself not pronounced. Therefore, by definition, no words can begin with this letter. The President, Erdogan; it's pronounced, "erdo An"; not, "erdo Gan"--BBC journalists seem to have, finally, got the message.

Is this relevant? Probably not; but, the old letter "g" gets itself around, working its magic. How things were pronounced, millenia ago, is a tall order to answer: customs, mores, evolution, convenience: we humans are bedevilled by our own inclination to laziness--if it's easy/ comfortable to soften/ drop a jerky pronunciation, that's exactly what will happen.....

The Pock. Ox. Lat. Dict. gives alternative form, "nosco", only; which may answer the Q for yourself. Placing a "g" in front of a consonant creates a jerky, clumsy pronunciation; the kind of thing which softens with time; perhaps pronounced "gernosco"; eventually falling out of use, altogether--"nosco".

As a boy, reading about WWII, thought that the name of the German battleship "Gneisanau" was pronounced "neisanau"; but it wasn't & isn't.

Then, in Turkish, there is "yamusak" (soft) "g" (pronounced "yamuSHak")--with a circumflex. It always comes after a vowel and turns that vowel into a long sound; but, is itself not pronounced. Therefore, by definition, no words can begin with this letter. The President, Erdogan; it's pronounced, "erdo An"; not, "erdo Gan"--BBC journalists seem to have, finally, got the message.

Is this relevant? Probably not; but, the old letter "g" gets itself around, working its magic. How things were pronounced, millenia ago, is a tall order to answer: customs, mores, evolution, convenience: we humans are bedevilled by our own inclination to laziness--if it's easy/ comfortable to soften/ drop a jerky pronunciation, that's exactly what will happen.

The Pock. Ox. Lat. Dict. gives alternative form, "nosco", only; which may answer the Q for yourself. Placing a "g" in front of a consonant creates a jerky, clumsy pronunciation; the kind of thing which softens with time; perhaps pronounced "gernosco"; eventually falling out of use, altogether--"nosco".

As a boy, reading about WWII, thought that the name of the German battleship "Gneisanau" was pronounced "neisanau"; but it wasn't & isn't.

Then, in Turkish, there is "yamusak" (soft) "g" (pronounced "yamuSHak")--with a circumflex. It always comes after a vowel and turns that vowel into a long sound; but, is itself not pronounced. Therefore, by definition, no words can begin with this letter. The President, Erdogan; it's pronounced, "erdo An"; not, "erdo Gan"--BBC journalists seem to have, finally, got the message.

Is this relevant? Probably not; but, the old letter "g" gets itself around, working its magic. How things were pronounced, millenia ago, is a tall order to answer: customs, mores, evolution, convenience: we humans are bedevilled by our own inclination to laziness--if it's easy/ comfortable to soften/ drop a jerky pronunciation, that's exactly what will happen.....

3 added 17 characters in body
source | link

The Pock. Ox. Lat. Dict. gives alternative form, "nosco", only; which may answer the Q for yourself. Placing a "g" in front of a consonant creates a jerky, clumsy pronunciation; the kind of thing which softens with time; perhaps pronounced "gernosco"; eventually falling out of use, altogether--"nosco".

As a boy, reading about WWII, thought that the name of the German battleship "Gneisanau" was pronounced "neisanau"; but it wasn't & isn't.

Then, in Turkish, there is "yamusak" (soft) "g" (pronounced "yamuSHak")--with a circumflex. It always comes after a vowel and turns that vowel into a long sound; but, is itself not pronounced. Therefore, by definition, no words can begin with this letter. The President is called "Erdo, Erdogan; it's pronounced, "erdo An"; not, "Erdo"erdo Gan"--BBC journalists seem to have, finally, got the message.

Is this relevant? Probably not; but, the old letter "g" gets itself around, working its magic. How things were pronounced, millenia ago, is a tall order to answer: customs, mores, evolution, convenience: we humans are bedevilled by our own inclination to laziness--if it's easy/ comfortable to soften/ drop a jerky pronunciation, that's exactly what will happen.

The Pock. Ox. Lat. Dict. gives alternative form, "nosco", only; which may answer the Q for yourself. Placing a "g" in front of a consonant creates a jerky, clumsy pronunciation; the kind of thing which softens with time; perhaps pronounced "gernosco"; eventually falling out of use, altogether--"nosco".

As a boy, reading about WWII, thought that the name of the German battleship "Gneisanau" was pronounced "neisanau"; but it wasn't & isn't.

Then, in Turkish, there is "yamusak" (soft) "g"--with a circumflex. It always comes after a vowel and turns that vowel into a long sound; but, is itself not pronounced. Therefore, by definition, no words can begin with this letter. The President is called "Erdo An"; not, "Erdo Gan"--BBC journalists seem to have, finally, got the message.

Is this relevant? Probably not; but, the old letter "g" gets itself around, working its magic. How things were pronounced, millenia ago, is a tall order to answer: customs, mores, evolution, convenience: we humans are bedevilled by our own inclination to laziness--if it's easy/ comfortable to soften/ drop a jerky pronunciation, that's exactly what will happen.

The Pock. Ox. Lat. Dict. gives alternative form, "nosco", only; which may answer the Q for yourself. Placing a "g" in front of a consonant creates a jerky, clumsy pronunciation; the kind of thing which softens with time; perhaps pronounced "gernosco"; eventually falling out of use, altogether--"nosco".

As a boy, reading about WWII, thought that the name of the German battleship "Gneisanau" was pronounced "neisanau"; but it wasn't & isn't.

Then, in Turkish, there is "yamusak" (soft) "g" (pronounced "yamuSHak")--with a circumflex. It always comes after a vowel and turns that vowel into a long sound; but, is itself not pronounced. Therefore, by definition, no words can begin with this letter. The President, Erdogan; it's pronounced, "erdo An"; not, "erdo Gan"--BBC journalists seem to have, finally, got the message.

Is this relevant? Probably not; but, the old letter "g" gets itself around, working its magic. How things were pronounced, millenia ago, is a tall order to answer: customs, mores, evolution, convenience: we humans are bedevilled by our own inclination to laziness--if it's easy/ comfortable to soften/ drop a jerky pronunciation, that's exactly what will happen.

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