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Are Latin verbs of motion satellite-framed, verb-framed, both, or neither?

Native English verbs of motion are said to be satellite-framed: the verb usually indicates the manner of motion and a "satellite" or particle word indicates the direction. For example, "He walked into the room," "She ran out of the room," "They floated into the room." The preposition need not take an object: "He walked in", "They floated out."

Verbs of motion in Romance languages are said to be verb-framed: the verb usually indicates the direction of motion and some complementary word, typically a gerund or participle, indicates the manner. For example, "Entró caminando en la sala," "Salió corriendo de la sala," "Entraron flotando en la sala." Native speakers of Romance languages often find the English use of prepositions without an object ("particles") jarring, as in "She walked out."

I expected Latin verbs of motion to work like those of the Romance languages, but so far in my occasional studies I haven't seen it. In fact, I've come across no shortage of verbs with a prefix indicating direction stuck on a verb indicating manner: incurro, emergo, etc. This pattern extends far beyond verbs of motion, of course. And I think one normally would say Daedalus cum filio e labyrintho evolavit, not …exiit volans.

On the other hand, in Latin I've also come across constructs like respondit dicens … where in English we would just say "He answered …". And Latin seems to make much heavier use of participles where English would more likely make another construct, such as an adverbial phrase, a relative clause, or a separate sentence, e.g. Nonne rex Minos Theseum cum Ariadna fugientem persecutus est? vs. "When Theseus and Ariadna fled, didn't King Minos chase them?"


The Latin examples above are from Lingua Latina Per Se Illustrata by Hans Ørberg.

Are Latin verbs of motion satellite-framed, verb-framed, both, or neither?

Native English verbs of motion are said to be satellite-framed: the verb usually indicates the manner of motion and a "satellite" or particle word indicates the direction. For example, "He walked into the room," "She ran out of the room," "They floated into the room." The preposition need not take an object: "He walked in", "They floated out."

Verbs of motion in Romance languages are said to be verb-framed: the verb usually indicates the direction of motion and some complementary word, typically a gerund or participle, indicates the manner. For example, "Entró caminando en la sala," "Salió corriendo de la sala," "Entraron flotando en la sala." Native speakers of Romance languages often find the English use of prepositions without an object ("particles") jarring, as in "She walked out."

I expected Latin verbs of motion to work like those of the Romance languages, but so far in my occasional studies I haven't seen it. In fact, I've come across no shortage of verbs with a prefix indicating direction stuck on a verb indicating manner: incurro, emergo, etc. This pattern extends far beyond verbs of motion, of course. And I think one normally would say Daedalus cum filio e labyrintho evolavit, not …exiit volans.

On the other hand, in Latin I've also come across constructs like respondit dicens … where in English we would just say "He answered …". And Latin seems to make much heavier use of participles where English would more likely make another construct, such as an adverbial phrase, a relative clause, or a separate sentence, e.g. Nonne rex Minos Theseum cum Ariadna fugientem persecutus est? vs. "When Theseus and Ariadna fled, didn't King Minos chase them?"

Are Latin verbs of motion satellite-framed, verb-framed, both, or neither?

Native English verbs of motion are said to be satellite-framed: the verb usually indicates the manner of motion and a "satellite" or particle word indicates the direction. For example, "He walked into the room," "She ran out of the room," "They floated into the room." The preposition need not take an object: "He walked in", "They floated out."

Verbs of motion in Romance languages are said to be verb-framed: the verb usually indicates the direction of motion and some complementary word, typically a gerund or participle, indicates the manner. For example, "Entró caminando en la sala," "Salió corriendo de la sala," "Entraron flotando en la sala." Native speakers of Romance languages often find the English use of prepositions without an object ("particles") jarring, as in "She walked out."

I expected Latin verbs of motion to work like those of the Romance languages, but so far in my occasional studies I haven't seen it. In fact, I've come across no shortage of verbs with a prefix indicating direction stuck on a verb indicating manner: incurro, emergo, etc. This pattern extends far beyond verbs of motion, of course. And I think one normally would say Daedalus cum filio e labyrintho evolavit, not …exiit volans.

On the other hand, in Latin I've also come across constructs like respondit dicens … where in English we would just say "He answered …". And Latin seems to make much heavier use of participles where English would more likely make another construct, such as an adverbial phrase, a relative clause, or a separate sentence, e.g. Nonne rex Minos Theseum cum Ariadna fugientem persecutus est? vs. "When Theseus and Ariadna fled, didn't King Minos chase them?"


The Latin examples above are from Lingua Latina Per Se Illustrata by Hans Ørberg.

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Are Latin verbs of motion satellite-framed, verb-framed, both, or neither?

Native English verbs of motion are said to be satellite-framed: the verb usually indicates the manner of motion and a "satellite" or particle word indicates the direction. For example, "He walked into the room," "She ran out of the room," "They floated into the room." The preposition need not take an object: "He walked in", "They floated out."

Verbs of motion in Romance languages are said to be verb-framed: the verb usually indicates the direction of motion and some complementary word, typically a gerund or participle, indicates the manner. For example, "Entró caminando en la sala," "Salió corriendo de la sala," "Entraron flotando en la sala." Native speakers of Romance languages often find the English use of prepositions without an object ("particles") jarring, as in "She walked out."

I expected Latin verbs of motion to work like those of the Romance languages, but so far in my occasional studies I haven't seen it. In fact, I've come across no shortage of verbs with a prefix indicating direction stuck on a verb indicating manner: incurro, emergo, etc. This pattern extends far beyond verbs of motion, of course. And I think one normally would say Daedalus cum filio e labyrintho evolavit, not …exiit volans.

On the other hand, in Latin I've also come across constructs like respondit dicens … where in English we would just say "He answered …". And Latin seems to make much heavier use of participles where English would more likely make another construct, such as an adverbial phrase, a relative clause, or a separate sentence, e.g. Nonne rex Minos Theseum cum Ariadna fugientem persecutus est? vs. "When Theseus and Ariadna fled, didn't King Minos chase them?"

Are Latin verbs of motion satellite-framed, verb-framed, both, or neither?

Native English verbs of motion are said to be satellite-framed: the verb usually indicates the manner of motion and a "satellite" or particle word indicates the direction. For example, "He walked into the room," "She ran out of the room," "They floated into the room."

Verbs of motion in Romance languages are said to be verb-framed: the verb usually indicates the direction of motion and some complementary word, typically a gerund or participle, indicates the manner. For example, "Entró caminando en la sala," "Salió corriendo de la sala," "Entraron flotando en la sala."

I expected Latin verbs of motion to work like those of the Romance languages, but so far in my occasional studies I haven't seen it. In fact, I've come across no shortage of verbs with a prefix indicating direction stuck on a verb indicating manner: incurro, emergo, etc. This pattern extends far beyond verbs of motion, of course. And I think one normally would say Daedalus cum filio e labyrintho evolavit, not …exiit volans.

On the other hand, in Latin I've also come across constructs like respondit dicens … where in English we would just say "He answered …". And Latin seems to make much heavier use of participles where English would more likely make another construct, such as an adverbial phrase, a relative clause, or a separate sentence, e.g. Nonne rex Minos Theseum cum Ariadna fugientem persecutus est? vs. "When Theseus and Ariadna fled, didn't King Minos chase them?"

Are Latin verbs of motion satellite-framed, verb-framed, both, or neither?

Native English verbs of motion are said to be satellite-framed: the verb usually indicates the manner of motion and a "satellite" or particle word indicates the direction. For example, "He walked into the room," "She ran out of the room," "They floated into the room." The preposition need not take an object: "He walked in", "They floated out."

Verbs of motion in Romance languages are said to be verb-framed: the verb usually indicates the direction of motion and some complementary word, typically a gerund or participle, indicates the manner. For example, "Entró caminando en la sala," "Salió corriendo de la sala," "Entraron flotando en la sala." Native speakers of Romance languages often find the English use of prepositions without an object ("particles") jarring, as in "She walked out."

I expected Latin verbs of motion to work like those of the Romance languages, but so far in my occasional studies I haven't seen it. In fact, I've come across no shortage of verbs with a prefix indicating direction stuck on a verb indicating manner: incurro, emergo, etc. This pattern extends far beyond verbs of motion, of course. And I think one normally would say Daedalus cum filio e labyrintho evolavit, not …exiit volans.

On the other hand, in Latin I've also come across constructs like respondit dicens … where in English we would just say "He answered …". And Latin seems to make much heavier use of participles where English would more likely make another construct, such as an adverbial phrase, a relative clause, or a separate sentence, e.g. Nonne rex Minos Theseum cum Ariadna fugientem persecutus est? vs. "When Theseus and Ariadna fled, didn't King Minos chase them?"

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source | link

Are Latin verbs of motion satellite-framed or verb-framed?

Are Latin verbs of motion satellite-framed, verb-framed, both, or neither?

Native English verbs of motion are said to be satellite-framed: the verb usually indicates the manner of motion and a "satellite" or particle word indicates the direction. For example, "He walked into the room," "She ran out of the room," "They floated into the room."

Verbs of motion in Romance languages are said to be verb-framed: the verb usually indicates the direction of motion and some complementary word, typically a gerund or participle, indicates the manner. For example, "Entró caminando en la sala," "Salió corriendo de la sala," "Entraron flotando en la sala."

I expected Latin verbs of motion to work like those of the Romance languages, but so far in my occasional studies I haven't seen it. In fact, I've come across no shortage of verbs with a prefix indicating direction stuck on a verb indicating manner: incurro, emergo, etc. This pattern extends far beyond verbs of motion, of course. And I think one normally would say Daedalus cum filio e labyrintho evolavit, not …exiit volans.

On the other hand, in Latin I've also come across constructs like respondit dicens … where in English we would just say "He answered …". And Latin seems to make much heavier use of participles where English would more likely make another construct, such as an adverbial phrase, a relative clause, or a separate sentence, e.g. Nonne rex Minos Theseum cum Ariadna fugientem persecutus est? vs. "When Theseus and Ariadna fled, didn't King Minos chase them?"